Property TV - Property Question Time - S2 EP 9 - John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney - Nova

Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney

Stephen Galpin:                Welcome to Property Question Time. My name is Stephen Galpin and this is the program where you can have your property related questions answered by our team of experts. Now joining me today are John Howard, property developer, author, public speaker, mentor, and investor.

John Howard:                    Goodness. That’s a mouthful, isn’t it?

Stephen Galpin:                Isn’t it? Just I wonder where you get the time, John?

John Howard:                    Well, ask a busy person.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay. Now sitting next to you is Paul Mahoney, CEO of Nova Financial Group, public speaker, author, and mentor to a number of investors, I think. We’re also joined by Angela Worral, direct by link to Portugal. Angela, hello. Right. John, I’m going to start with you. Your first question is this.

John Howard:                    Yes.

Stephen Galpin:                Can the panel please explain how developer and HBC guarantees work? I am now outside of my two-year initial developer guarantee and every thought I report now seems to not be covered. Now we’ve had this one in a lot, so.

John Howard:                    We have and it’s close to my heart having to use these warranty companies. The first thing I would say there’s an awful lot of warranty companies about now. In the old days, there used to be probably two or three. Now there’s a huge choice for developers to go to, so they’re much more competitive. However, the big ones, the well-known ones, which we can’t say on the show for obvious reasons, they’re very expensive compared to some of the others that they cover, and it’s an insurance cover at the end of the day is what we’re talking about here. For the eight years, normally between the two years, so the developer covers the first two years and then after that the next eight years or 10 years depending are covered. So, you’re covered for 10 years in total. Covered by an insurance back policy is what it is. It’s insurance back policy.

Now during the process of the development, they will check everything with their surveyors as you go through that process. So, as the property is built or converted, they will check at every stage to make sure they’re happy, and they’re willing to insure it at the end for the 10 years. So, what you do find like any insurance policy, read the small print because there will be things that are not covered.

Stephen Galpin:                But you’re not going to get a choice, are you John? A developer will present you with the warranty, won’t they?

John Howard:                    No. You will be presented with a warranty and of course, the [inaudible 00:02:48] have also accepted that warranty because now even on a conversion… In the old days when we converted flats, we never ever bothered with any sort of warranty. Now, with conversions, you get a six-year warranty. We never used to bother. We never used to have to do it. Now, most buildings sites require it, which is probably not a bad thing. And that’s why all these smaller insurance companies have come up now that weren’t about because they’re more competitive, especially on smaller sites than they are the big boys. So, anyone doing a small conversion, if you haven’t got a warranty organized, get it organized. If you do it retrospectively at the end, it’s more expensive. So, please, please, please. It’s one of the main things you have to do these days.

Stephen Galpin:                Do you think a lot of these problems come because people just don’t quite get the meaning of a building fault as opposed to an occurring fault, like a crack wall or this?

Paul Mahoney:                  The good point there that’s specific to that question, they said the two years has passed. The two years covers minor defects. A building warranty only covers major defects, so your towels falling off the wall, that’s not going to be covered by your building warranty. It only covers the structure of the building, design defects, water ingress, things like that. Major defects in the building, so perhaps they’ve just misunderstood what they were covered there. John-

John Howard:                    It’s not that. And when you work it out, although it’s painful for us to have to pay it, it isn’t actually that expensive. When you look at it from the developer, really.

Paul Mahoney:                  And John mentioned you do need to be careful with the policy. You mentioned about buyer might not have a choice, but they do have a choice because when they buy the property they will be told what warranty is going to be in place. And there are some smaller insurers out there now, but one of them went bust last year and that meant a lot of people were left uncovered. So, you do need to be careful. And another thing to be careful of is the smaller insurers aren’t on the panel for a lot of lenders. So, the biggest is on every panel, the bigger are on most panels, and the smaller ones are on a very few lenders panels, so that’s another thing you need to be careful because it can affect the mortgage ability of the property as well.

John Howard:                    Paul makes a really, really good point there that I’m really annoyed about because I missed making that point myself. And that is some of the smaller insurers. Be careful, ask them what panel they’re on if they’re on the main building site panel, great. If they’re not, don’t use them.

Stephen Galpin:                Yeah. John, it may come as a surprise, but not all of us are perfect, so you’ll be excused.

John Howard:                    I strive to, so.

Paul Mahoney:                  There’s another point there as well. Something that was quite prevalent not so long ago was architect’s certificates.

John Howard:                    Yes.

Paul Mahoney:                  And again, a lot of those aren’t accepted especially for new builds by lenders.

John Howard:                    No.

Paul Mahoney:                  So, that’s another thing to be careful of.

John Howard:                    A lot of people on those, they used to use them when they’re building their own home and the architect would try and get involved in all aspects of the construction. If you’ve got a good architect, let them do the drawings or her do the drawings then say to them, “Thank you very much for doing the drawings. If we need you in the future to redo anything, we’ll be in touch.” Do not let them oversee a project.

Paul Mahoney:                  I don’t know about you John, but I’ve never actually heard of a building warranty paying out. They are literally almost there.

John Howard:                    That’s a bit harsh.

Paul Mahoney:                  Have you ever of one paying out?

John Howard:                    On occasions with a big problem, to be fair.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. In what I’ve seen it’s mainly to tick the box for what the lender wants.

Stephen Galpin:                I think we might get in trouble if we carry on with this one. I think Paul, we’re going to move on to your question. All right. Paul, this is going to be right up your street to somebody who advises on strategy and development of portfolios. If I start out with just a modest amount of equity, does a panel believe that it would be possible to build a buy to that portfolio within around say 10 years to enable it to me to then sell the portfolio and retire with a reasonable capital gain?

Paul Mahoney:                  Okay. That’s a good question. A fairly common one. I do believe that that’s very achievable. I think that the main reason it’s achievable specifically in property versus other options is due to what leverage does to your funds applied. So, for example, they mentioned about having a limited amount of equity. If you take, as an example, a 50,000-pound deposit and buy a 200,000-pound property, a relatively average return on the asset value gives you quite a strong return on the funds applied. A five to 10% net yield is very achievable, and then if you’re getting 5% growth on the asset value, well that’s 20% on your cash. That puts you at 25 to 30% a year. And that’s by not setting the world on fire at all. I think everyone would agree that 25 to 30% a year on funds applied, that’s a good return and that’s a fairly average buy to let.

So, over a period of five, 10 years by remortgaging to release equity and reinvesting, and perhaps adding some extra funds as well, it actually is quite achievable to build a portfolio in that way because it can also have a snowball effect. You start with one. You remortgage and reinvest and you have two. And then over another, let’s say two to four year period, you’re able to do that again, and then you’ve got four, and then eight, and so on and so forth. So, it’s not a get-rich-quick scheme by any stretch of the imagination, it’s a slow burn. But if you’re investing in the right properties in the right areas then by all means that is a way of building a portfolio and certainly significantly improving your financial position.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay. Paul, given the vagrances of the market at any one time, do you think 10 years is a reasonable time span to consolidate it all?

Paul Mahoney:                  I think for an individual property purchase as an investment and you should be looking at it as at least as a seven to 12-year investment at least.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay.

Paul Mahoney:                  Because of the way the market is cyclical, usually longer, but you shouldn’t be looking at it as any shorter than that. That’s the one property. But given the way that mortgages are structured and generally that you’re getting a two or three-year initial period, assuming that the market’s doing okay or more specifically your properties are doing okay, ideally it’d be great to be able to remortgage, pull some equity out every two or three years to be able to go again. And that might not be the case every time, but hopefully, it’s the case most times and that’s what allows you to build the portfolio.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay, thank you. Right. We’re going to skip over now for some sunshine to Portugal. And Angela’s question is this, I’m considering purchasing a small Villa type property in a coastal area of Portugal. I have in the past owned property in Spain, which was not a happy experience after purchasing the property, I found that there were debts left by the previous owner, which effectively stayed with the property, not the owner. In the end, I had to pay off these debts. Is it the same in Portugal? And if it is, are there any measures that I can take to make sure the same doesn’t happen again? Angela.

Angela Worral:                 When you buy a property in Protugal, yes. The debt, it’s the same. The mortgage is with the house, not with the person who owns the house and what you need to do to make sure this doesn’t happen, it’s a straightforward process, you get a good lawyer. If you get a good lawyer, the lawyer will do the research. This is one of the main things that he searches. Any debt on the house will show up. He doesn’t have to do a major job to find it. It’s always there, it’s plain to see. And then it will be made that the vendor, the person selling the house, pays the debt before you do any signing of any deeds or anything. And so, yes. It is something that you need to make sure it’s done properly. And like I said, go with a good agent and a good lawyer and you won’t have any problems with anything like that.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay. Angela, thank you very much indeed for your answer. That was great. That’s all we have time for in this part of the program. So, join us again after the break.

John Howard:                    Hi, I’m John Howard and I’m known as the property expert. The reason for this is over the last 40 odd years I’ve bought and sold over three and a half thousand properties, and I’m still going. I’m delighted to pass on my past experience and knowledge to you through my property seminars that are taking place across the UK this year. To know more, please go to johnhowardpropertyexpert.co.uk.

Speaker 5:                          If you’re dreaming of a home in Portugal, look no further. Ideal Homes is here to help. We have over 10 years experience finding people their dream homes in the Algarve, Lisbon, and across the rest of the country. We pride ourselves in offering a friendly personal service, and if you’d like your dream of a home in Portugal to become reality, then contact us now and see how easy the process can be. Call 0800-133-7644, or visit idealhomesinternational.co.uk.

Speaker 6:                          Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources and regardless of our experience, knowledge, or time, we can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team, and extra resources being available. Nova Financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom through property investment. With over a hundred years of experience, we shape your family’s future. To invest in property with absolute confidence, call us on 0203-8000-600, or visit nova.financial. Meet The Author is a brand-new mini-series involving leading experts in the property industry, including mentors, developers, property lawyers, and other industry experts who share insightful stories about their journey and their books. Each book is compiled by authors with years of valuable experience, tips, and observations providing you with new knowledge about the property industry. To find out more, visit the website, property-tv.co.uk/library.

Stephen Galpin:                Hello, and welcome back to part two of Property Question Time. I’m Stephen Galpin and with me, I have John Howard, Paul Mahoney, and Angela Worral in Portugal. John, your second question.

John Howard:                    Yes.

Stephen Galpin:                I’m hoping to become a property developer-

John Howard:                    Good.

Stephen Galpin:                …and have attended a number of events providing guidance and advice.

John Howard:                    Excellent.

Stephen Galpin:                I now understand how and where to look for potential projects. I’ve also taken on board the need to have good professional teams around me.

John Howard:                    Thank goodness for that.

Stephen Galpin:                Yes, well-

John Howard:                    Makes a change.

Stephen Galpin:                …my music to ears, isn’t it?

John Howard:                    Yeah.

Stephen Galpin:                Yeah. The one thing that worries me is if the project overruns because of unforeseen difficulties or perhaps a change in the market conditions, how do I protect myself against this situation damaging me?

John Howard:                    Okay. Well, I’ve got bad news for this person.

Stephen Galpin:                He’s on his own?

John Howard:                    No. It will definitely overrun-

Stephen Galpin:                Right.

John Howard:                    …in terms of time and it will probably overrun in terms of cost. That’s why you have a contingency sum. If it’s a new build, I would have five to 7% contingency. If it’s conversion, I would have 10%. If it’s a list of buildings, I would have a 15% contingency, that’s what we work on. So, if something goes wrong, long as it’s within that contingency sum, you’re okay. Make sure you have the cash for the contingency sum because the bank may not let you have any more money. So, you need to have the cash to cover that because the builder won’t finish the job if you can’t pay him.

Stephen Galpin:                You haven’t got the money.

John Howard:                    So, you just need to be careful. Don’t kid yourself. There won’t be an overrun. There will be on time. I think I am quoted as saying I’ve never got it. I’ve got one, right? But never both. And that’s in 40 years. That makes me a bad developer or it makes me human. I don’t know which. It’s very hard to come in on time and on budget, really hard.

Stephen Galpin:                I think on Question Time, we’ve had so many questions around this sort of subject and time is the one thing people overlook every time.

John Howard:                    Without question. Time is so valuable and it just slows you down from getting onto the next day or getting the properties for sale. Because remember you can put your property on the market whenever you want, but you know what? No one would buy that property until they can move into it. So, you can kid yourself by you putting on early. Don’t put your property on the market early unless it’s a new build and you’re sending off-plan. Don’t do it because no one can move in. You want that property look its best it can when it goes on the market. So, wait and be patient.

Stephen Galpin:                Paul, anything on the funding side of that you can do to protect?

Paul Mahoney:                  Well, look. As John kind of said, there’s very little you can do to protect against the market moving against you, and that’s obviously the biggest risk with property development I suppose. You-

John Howard:                    And that’s the problem when you take too long to do something, if the market’s going the wrong way, that’s another issue.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, and probably the finance is one of the biggest risks associated with that. It’s not just about the value changing, it’s about the cost of the debt.

John Howard:                    Absolutely.

Paul Mahoney:                  If the project takes you twice-

John Howard:                    Six months longer.

Paul Mahoney:                  …the amount of time or however much longer there’s usually a big cost of debt there as well, so that needs to be factored into the contingencies that John’s told you about.

Stephen Galpin:                If you go to your lender, presuming it’s a sort of mainstream commercial lender, let’s put it that way.

John Howard:                    We hope they do.

Stephen Galpin:                Let’s put it that way. Will that commercial lender join you in sort of some kind of sympathy over the market conditions changing?

Paul Mahoney:                  Some won’t. Some will give you a fixed period and that’s it. And they’ll recall the debt on that point. I’d say most would generally provide some flexibility but-

John Howard:                    But they’ll charge you more for it.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. They’re going to take the essential-

John Howard:                    The advice is simple if you think it’s going to take a year, tell the bank it’s going to take 18 months. Give yourself some leeway. Don’t show off to the bank and tell them you’re going to do it nine months. Give yourself some leeway. The whole point is taking pressure off yourself. Under-promise and over-deliver every time.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. The margin thing is obviously key as well.

John Howard:                    Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:                  I think a lot of people rush into property development as an easy way to make money without considering the value of their time as well. They obviously need to be making enough money from it for it to be worth the 18 months of their time.

John Howard:                    Sure.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah.

Stephen Galpin:                Got it. Paul, your question. Something is cropping up quite a lot lately and that’s the subject of equity release. Can the panel advise me on the merits or otherwise of equity release schemes? I’m about to retire and such a scheme would seem to pay off my small outstanding mortgage and also provide a cash boost to my savings. I just have a feeling there must be a catch.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yes. There is a catch because effectively what you’re doing is drawing down on the equity of your home to live off. So, obviously that’s not an ideal scenario in comparison to living off your investment portfolio if that makes sense. Because you’ve got your home and in some cases by the time you pass away, there’s no value left.

John Howard:                    Allow me to be fair, Paul. That’s okay if you live on, or you have a particular relative, or you don’t like your children.

Paul Mahoney:                  For a particular type of a person, I suppose. Yeah.

John Howard:                    It’s perfect. So, you want to spend it, spend it, spend it. So, but-

Stephen Galpin:                I don’t think Paul’s advisory team will be mentioned.

John Howard:                    No. Probably not but there’s a number of forms of it because you can take some equity out, you can keep some equity, or you can do a life tendency, can’t you? There’s another one where you actually sell the property and then you live there free of charge for the rest of your life. So, there’s a number of ways.

Paul Mahoney:                  My view on it would be why would you… Let’s put the phrase another way. If you had the cash in the bank, why would you spend that cash to live when you could invest that cash and live off the returns of your investment? Now for this same person, they could do that. Rather than drawing down the equity of their home to live, they could take some of that equity and buy a couple of buy-to-lets and live off the income from the buy-to-lets, rather than spending what they have.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay. Well, that would prompt another question though, Paul. Do you think somebody… As this questionnaire is coming up to retirement age, would you really suggest that perhaps for the first time they go in business in the property market?

Paul Mahoney:                  With the right guidance, it can be quite straightforward. I wouldn’t necessarily say they just take the money, throw a dart at a dartboard, buy anything and hope it works out. With the right guidance, it can be relatively passive and obviously they need to go about it in the right way, but what I thought you were going to ask is should this person moving into retirement take on some debt? And my answer to that is in a lot of cases, yes. Because investment debt is good debt. Now, if you’ve got a limited amount of resources and you can use somebody else’s money to make a lot more money than the cost of that debt, then yes you should do it. And some buy-to-let lenders will lend to you up to the age of 100.

John Howard:                    They’re optimistic.

Paul Mahoney:                  So, most people aren’t too old.

Stephen Galpin:                I think one of the concerns that I’m sort of reading between the lines here is that there’s been a lot of publicity recently in so much as the way the interest is calculated because it seems to me you retain ownership of your home. You take this mortgage out without repayment effectively, and then that interest is just charged to your account and settled as in when you either go into care or you pass away.

John Howard:                    Yes.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah.

Stephen Galpin:                But I think there’s been some questions around about how that interest is calculated and the way it’s compounded I think.

Paul Mahoney:                  Well, yeah. It’s somewhat comparable to an annuity. When you’re drawing down on your pension at a fairly rubbish rate, annuities are very limiting. And I’d say the same would apply to the equity release program moving into retirement.

John Howard:                    Yeah.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay, good. Okay. Well, that seems a splendid answer. Thank you very much. So, we’ll now go over to Angela for her final question. If I want to reserve an apartment in a development that is yet to be constructed, what are the normal conditions of payment that would apply from the start through the construction process right through to completion? Is there any specific or cautionary advice the panel would give regarding that kind of purchase?

Angela Worral:                 In my opinion, if you want to buy a property, more like especially if you want an investment, the best way to buy is off plat because that’s where you make your money. You’re buying a property that’s not even started to be built and by the time you’re paying for, it’s built. So, it’s always going to be worth a lot more money. Yes. There is always an element to risk in this kind of… And that’s why again, you need to go with someone that knows the developer, meet the developer, know that it’s like the certain developers that use their own money, they don’t use the banks. These are always going to fulfill what they’re telling you they’re going to. And you just need to, like I said, be with a good agent that you can trust that will make sure that you’re going down the right route.

In Portugal, it’s very much like a much safer than it is in some places. This is due to the buying process. So, should you see an apartment development that you want to buy, it’s going to be ready in two years’ time for instance. The buying process is very much geared around looking after you as well as the developer. So, you would put down a reservation fee for 6,000. That’s 6,000 on the chosen unit. This is a refundable 6,000 euros. And the lawyer will then do other searches, which is not very often a right lot when it comes to a new development because all the paperwork has to be there from them to start developing it. What they do then is once everything’s okay, you go ahead with the purchasing of that property. Should this something come up that the lawyer thinks is not right, and he will have a look further into it, or he will advise you not to go down that route, which is very rare that that happens on this candidate development.

And then you would get your 6,000 euros returned to you. That’s always just kept in an escrow account. It doesn’t go to the developer or anything. And so, once you’ve decided yeah, this is what I want to purchase. Then, you will be asked to put… Usually, with a development it’s 20%. There can be different payment plans. It can work differently, but a lot are 20% down and once you put that 20% down, you will sign a contract, which we call a promissory contract, to say that you want to go ahead with the purchase. Now at this stage, if you back out, although remember, you’re in a position, you’ve had everything done, you’re quite confident that this is what you want to purchase, but should you back out, you would lose your 20%. The 6,000 you’ve already paid, which is part of this 20% now, so that’s all a stage of put down.

If the developer decides that it’s not going to go ahead or there’s something not right, he would have to give you the 20% back plus another 20%. Now, this is done before anything else, so if anything happened with the developer for some reason that he wasn’t fulfilling what he’s told you he’s going to, then the government would make him pay you back before anything else is covered. So, the bank would repossess it, but they would give you your money back, so you will get to book your 20% back. So, it’s quite safeguarded. I’m not sure that saying that’ll be the week after or anything like that, but it is safeguarded and your money is safe. Some developers are also, you can get a bank guarantee from them because the banks trust them so much.

If you’re having a mortgage, you would apply for them for your mortgage. So, you’d get preapproved of your mortgage so you’d know that you can have one. And as long as nothing has changed in your circumstances, you then apply for them always three months before completion because a mortgage application only lasts three months. So, two to three months before completion, you apply for your mortgage, and your mortgage is all paid on the deed. Obviously, you’ve already paid your 20%, so it’s quite straightforward and an easy process and it is a safe day. There’s a lot of safety checks in there. For certain stages of the build, they have to stop build while an architect from the government, an engineer from the government, somebody overlooks at the habitation of it, and they check the plans, and they make sure everything’s okay before they go ahead and carry on with the build. So, it is quite a safe thing to do. And like I say, it is a good way to buy property because you’re going to make money.

For instance, you could buy something, and this has been no lie. Last year a guy bought some property 360,000 when it was first released. He then sold it 18 months later or the complete product for 660 because a lot of people want a complete product sometimes. So, it’s a good thing to do.

Stephen Galpin:                Right. Well, thank you very much, Angela. It’s a great answer. Most helpful. So, all that remains is to say thank you very much to our panel of experts. John Howard.

John Howard:                    Pleasure Stephen.

Stephen Galpin:                Paul Mahoney.

Paul Mahoney:                  Thank you, Stephen.

Stephen Galpin:                Thank you, Paul. And Angela Worral in Portugal. Join us again next time on Property Question Time.

Speaker 5:                          If you’re dreaming of a home in Portugal, look no further. Ideal Homes is here to help. We have over 10 years experience finding people their dream homes in the Algarve, Lisbon, and across the rest of the country. We pride ourselves in offering a friendly personal service, and if you’d like your dream of a home in Portugal to become reality, then contact us now and see how easy the process can be. Call 0800-133-7644, or visit idealhomesinternational.co.uk.

Speaker 6:                          Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources and regardless of our experience, knowledge, or time, we can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team, and extra resources being available. Nova Financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom through property investment. With over a hundred years of experience, we shape your family’s future. To invest in property with absolute confidence, call us on 0203-8000-600, or visit nova.financial.

John Howard:                    My name’s John Howard, and I’ve been investing and developing properties for over 40 years. In that time I’ve been a very successful, but of course, I’ve always made the odd mistake as well. In my book, I explain how to be successful and what to do should something go wrong. I’ve survived three property recessions. I can help you do the same. My book is available online. Please go to johnhowardpropertyexpert.co.uk.

Speaker 6:                          Meet The Author is a brand-new mini-series involving leading experts in the property industry, including mentors, developers, property lawyers, and other industry experts who share insightful stories about their journey and their books. Each book is compiled by authors with years of valuable experience, tips, and observations providing you with new knowledge about the property industry. To find out more, visit the website, property-tv.co.uk/library.

Stephen Galpin:                Hello and welcome to Property TV. I’m Stephen Galpin, host of Property Question Time. We’ve completed the filming of series one, over 260 successful episodes. We’re now about to film series two. The difference, well, we’re going to be filming in our new studio adjacent to the Canary Wharf development. Keep those questions coming into us. Keep our panelists, our experts busy, and we hope you enjoyed the new series as much as you did the last one.

 

Property Question Time

Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 10 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 10 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 6 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 6 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 5 – John Howard, Trevor Leggett and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 5 – John Howard, Trevor Leggett and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 4 – John Howard, Trevor Leggett and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 4 – John Howard, Trevor Leggett and Paul Mahoney
read more
Want to be the first to know what’s going on in the world of property investment? Subscribe to our newsletter below.
The property pension plan book icon

Take Control Of Your Future With Buy To Let Investment, get The Property Pension Plan for Free!

Find Out More
Get in Touch

Book a complimentary property and/or finance consultation

back-to-top