Property TV - Property Question Time - S2 EP 5 - John Howard, Trevor Leggett and Paul Mahoney - Nova

Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 5 – John Howard, Trevor Leggett and Paul Mahoney

Stephen Galpin:                Hello and welcome to Property Question Time. I’m Stephen Galpin and this is the program where you can have your property related questions answered by a team of experts. Joining me today are John Howard, property developer, author and mentor. John, welcome.

John Howard:                    Thank you.

Stephen Galpin:                Paul Mahoney, founder of Nova financial group, author and of course public speaker.

Paul Mahoney:                  Thanks to you.

Stephen Galpin:                Welcome to you Paul. And Trevor Leggett, co-founder of Leggett Immobilier, French property experts. Trevor, welcome.

Trevor Leggett:                 Welcome.

Stephen Galpin:                Thank you for traveling to join us today. John, we’re going to go to you first for the first question, right? Does the panel think that when the London crossrail services start, which I think is next year, it will influence prices at the locations of the stations across London towards Heathrow. I’m told by agents that this may be the case and if I am looking for investment, this will be one of the foremost opportunities in London. What do you think?

John Howard:                    Well, first of all, you’re… He’s quite right to be looking for an angle, something that’s going to increase the value more than inflation or anything else, and of course what he’s talking about may well be the case. I would say it’s probably already been priced in, in these areas already. That’s the only thing I would say. There might be a bit more to come because people might realize how good it is and how popular it is. But some of the increase has probably already been priced in and of course agents love to talk a good game, so bear that in mind as well.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay. Paul, any thoughts on that?

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, I agree. I think most of it probably will definitely is already priced in. And if you look at places like Whitechapel and Woolwich, they’ve doubled in value, pretty well solely because of that. There’s not really much other reason or anything else that’s happened in those areas other than them being relatively close to central London. They’ve increased substantially more than other areas that aren’t on that line. But I do think there probably will be a little bit of an increase once the utility exists…

John Howard:                    Especially if it’s more… If it turns out to be more popular than they thought it would be or whatever-

Stephen Galpin:                It’s going to be an amazing service. There’s no… [crosstalk 00:02:42] Have you seen the station here, John? It’s quite a stunning enterprise and the shops have been open for quite some time now and it’s going to be 45 minutes to Heathrow from East London, which is fantastic, isn’t it?

John Howard:                    So it should, isn’t it?

Stephen Galpin:                It does indeed. Paul. Anything extra to add to that?

Paul Mahoney:                  I do agree with what John said though so far as having an angle. There are other angles aside from crossrail that you can take, that probably have more legs in them from now. But definitely you want things to be moving in the right direction.

Stephen Galpin:                I think you make good points when you say a lot of these rises have already been factored [crosstalk 00:03:15] in. I mean, I could remember moving to London sort of 30 odd years ago and everybody telling me that city road was going to be the place. I’m still waiting and I’m still watching it, and I still not that keen to get out of my car after dusk there. So… But… There we are. That’s life, isn’t it? Okay. Let’s move on then. To pull your question, like a lot of younger people, I’m having difficulty and getting together the deposit to buy my first property. Although there are quite a lot of shared ownership opportunities available, I wonder if it would be preferable to perhaps buy jointly with say two or three friends, rather than on my own. Any advice would be appreciated.

Paul Mahoney:                  So they mentioned shared ownership, they didn’t mention help to buy, which as we’ve discussed in a previous episode, I think is a better scheme.

Stephen Galpin:                Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:                  And would likely give them more flexibility on getting the deposit. They only require 5% and a lot of devel… And as a first time buyer they have the first time buyers concession on stamp duty, if the price is over and above that. A lot of developers are paying the balance so literally is only 5%, meaning they can buy a 500 grand property for 25 grand.

John Howard:                    Divided buy three potentially if there’s three of them buying.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. If there’s three of them buying, obviously if there is three of them buying, it doesn’t need to be their residential place, your home. So they do need to live there. That might be the difficult thing for three of them together.

But that’s potentially an option. I’d certainly say explore up to buy and you get the 40%… In London you get a 40% equity loan, which is free for five years, and then at a very low interest rate to 10 years. So you have a 10 year flexibility. And the idea there is that over that 10 years, your income should increase, your financial position should increase. Hopefully, the value of the property increases as well.

Stephen Galpin:                And your requirements change, I suppose.

Paul Mahoney:                  [crosstalk 00:05:07] Yeah. It puts you in a better position to be able to buy that property outright on your own. So that’s what most people-

Stephen Galpin:                Trevor?

Paul Mahoney:                  Are now doing the first [crosstalk 00:05:16].

Stephen Galpin:                Anything to add to that Trevor?

Trevor Leggett:                 Well, I mean now the unfortunate thing of the whole thing is interest rates being so low. While it’s great to borrow, it’s really not encouraging young people to save. And, I mean, everybody says they can’t save. They don’t save, but the problem, is saving is not fashionable. It’s almost a word that we’ve forgotten about, and nobody’s encouraged or [crosstalk 00:05:35] in there, there is no real-

Stephen Galpin:                When you think it, if you’re going to get half a percent on your savings-

Trevor Leggett:                 If that’s the issue. But I mean the thing is, I know [inaudible 00:05:41] people are saying [inaudible 00:05:42] you can’t save anything, but you can if you try hard. I know when I bought my first home long, long time ago, I’d saved for two years to not only save up in those days, we could buy the whole bloody else, but I shall even not [inaudible 00:05:56] You can’t do that anymore. I went without considerable things. One day [crosstalk 00:06:04] you may go down the pub, you didn’t eat fleshy thing, you weren’t going to restaurants, you weren’t doing this, you weren’t doing that. I don’t see young people-

John Howard:                    [crosstalk 00:06:11] Most people I would say-

Trevor Leggett:                 Prepared to make many sacrifices in order to save up for deposit as you say.

John Howard:                    They want to own now.

Trevor Leggett:                 They want everything straight away [crosstalk 00:06:17].

Paul Mahoney:                  There is a bit of a victim mentality, I think so far as properties being [crosstalk 00:06:21] prices being so high-

Trevor Leggett:                 Yeah, that’s right.

Paul Mahoney:                  And people saying, “I can’t save. I can’t afford it,” but the reality is I agree. [crosstalk 00:06:26].

John Howard:                    All right Trevor. You can’t totally equate. I don’t think young people, they’ve had it as so good for many, many years-

Trevor Leggett:                 The government [crosstalk 00:06:31] we bet it to promote saving than they would to keep giving help-

John Howard:                    Well, they do something. They do ISIS and other things like that to be fair.

Trevor Leggett:                 [crosstalk 00:06:36] To buy help to this.

Stephen Galpin:                Now Paul, I’m going to ask you as a sort of independent party here. I’m not going to ask our property developer friends. I’m reading in the papers. A lot of people saying, “The actual uptake on this help to buy is not that clever and actually, it’s helped more developers than it has purchasers.”

Paul Mahoney:                  Well, it’s definitely helped developers. There’s no doubt about that, and there’s no doubt about the reason why John loves it. But it does… It definitely has helped more first time buyers get into the market. There’s no doubt about that. I’ve seen that personally. So it is helping. It helps… Think of these things certainly help to a certain extent obviously, because even with it, if for example you’re talking about London, even with help to buy, you still need to have about 50 grand of income to be able to afford the 55% mortgage. And some people would say, “Well that’s nearly doubled the UK average,” and it is, and therefore, it doesn’t necessarily help people at the bottom of the market-

John Howard:                    But that-

Paul Mahoney:                  But in saying that, I don’t necessarily think people have an entitlement to own property. They need to be able to afford to own property.

Trevor Leggett:                 Well, you need to make sacrifices.

Paul Mahoney:                  Far too many people say, “Well, I can’t buy in the place in the area I grew up. We’ll move somewhere else then.”

John Howard:                    Spot on Paul, you make a very, very good point there. And I’ve been accused of being a bit ruthless by saying that, but you’re absolutely right. And the other thing I would say-

Trevor Leggett:                 No. You don’t know.

John Howard:                    [crosstalk 00:07:58] I know it’s a surprise, isn’t it? But what I would say at you Steven is that, there’s more first time buyers now than at any times is 1985. Now, whatever you might say about the scheme, that is a fact. You can’t get around that.

Stephen Galpin:                But I suppose the question is, how many of them are availing themselves of that particular-

John Howard:                    As I s… If I may repeat the same answer. There are more first time buyers now than anytime since 1985.

Stephen Galpin:                Right. Okay. Well on that note we’ll move on. Trevor. I’ve just purchased an apartment in the North of France and we’re now debating our use of a motor-

Trevor Leggett:                 [crosstalk 00:08:36] You’re in Belgium then.

Stephen Galpin:                Right. Probably.

Trevor Leggett:                 You are already British.

Stephen Galpin:                Our use of a motor vehicle for both now and in the future. Although we will not be full time residents for summer time. What are the advantages or disadvantages of using a UK registered vehicle in France for instance, is there a maximum amount of time one can use a UK registered car in France? Are there any restrictions for non full time residents purchasing a French vehicle? Any advice would be most helpful.

Trevor Leggett:                 It isn’t that easy though.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay.

Trevor Leggett:                 So anyway, you’re allowed to take… You live… When you move to France, you’re allowed to take your French V… Your British vehicle with you or your foreign vehicle from wherever you like in the world. And you have a six month grace period to register it in France, so you can keep it there for six months. If the car then returns to the UK and stays every six months, you can take it back for another six months. If you want it to be… If you’re a resident in France, your vehicle that you use daily should remain on French plates or be translated onto French plates. Your UK car can stay on UK plates and travel back and forth to France as often as you like, but that’s if you’re a UK resident with a holiday home in France. Now if you’re a UK resident and holiday home in France, you can buy a French car providing you’ve got an address to register it to, and a utility bill in your name. That’s all you need.

Stephen Galpin:                All right.

Trevor Leggett:                 But it’s cheaper because you don’t have road tax in France. Insurance is cheaper and you insure the car, not the person. So there’s a much better, cheaper, easier way to insure your vehicle. In the UK the advantage used to be, if you’re a UK registered car, you didn’t get speeding tickets, but now they’re sending them all back to the UK, so that’s finished.

[crosstalk 00:10:22] I think everybody would think cool. There was something wrong. I think the French were in the press about sometime last year that they were going after good… There were 500 million pounds with them [crosstalk 00:10:30] unpaid fines, the Brits over the l… The last God knows how many years or I think the government turns, “Oh, don’t think we can access the database. Let’s start sending all the fines back to the UK,” So they did.

Stephen Galpin:                So I think you’re overall advice is, then if you’re going to spend anything like a reasonable amount of time in France, best to buy-

Trevor Leggett:                 Yeah. Just buy a French car. Much easier.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay, great stuff. All right. Well, that’s all we have time for this half of the program. Join us again after the break.

John Howard:                    My name is John Howard, and I’ve been investing and developing properties for over 40 years. In that time, I’ve been very successful, but of course, I’ve always made the odd mistake as well. In my book, I explain how to be successful, and what to do should something go wrong. I’ve survived three property recessions. I can help you to the same. My book is available online. Please go to johnhowardpropertyexpert.co.uk

Speaker 6:                          Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’re ever made. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources and regardless of our experience, knowledge, or time, we can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team, and extra resources being available. Nova financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom, through property investment. With over a hundred years of experience, we shape your family’s future to invest in property with absolute confidence. Call us on 0203 8000 600, or visit nova.financial

Speaker 7:                          The antiquated village of the Rosh Basque in rural [door 00:12:07] door inn may not have the cachet of Paris or London, yet it houses one of the 10 fastest growing property consultancies in Europe. It is home to Leggett Immonilier, the leading international estate agent in France. They have around 16,000 properties for sale, right across the country with a network of 400 agents, who provide local expertise and market knowledge. If you want to know the best villages, schools, restaurants, or [ballongeries 00:12:35], then the Leggett team will know the answer. As well as advising buyers on the local market and regional property prices, they also have a bilingual contracts team, who ensure that your purchase will go through as smoothly as possible. Leggett has been voted best estate agent in France for the past four years running. To experience these exceptional service levels for yourself, then head to our website leggettfrance.com

Speaker 8:                          Meet The Author, is a brand new mini series involving leading experts in the property industry including mentors, developers, property lawyers and other industry experts, who share insightful stories about their journey and their books. Each book is compiled by authors with years of valuable experience, tips and observations, providing you with new knowledge about the property industry. To find out more, visit the website, property-tv.co.uk/library

Stephen Galpin:                Hello and welcome to property TV. I’m Stephen Galpin, host of Property Question Time. We’ve completed the filming of series one, over 260 successful episodes. We’re now about to film series two. The difference, well, we’re going to be filming in our new studio adjacent to the Canary Wharf development. Keep those questions coming in to us. Keep our panelists, our experts busy, and we hope you enjoyed the new series, as much as you did the last one.

Hello. Welcome back to part two of Property Questions. I’m known as Stephen Galpin, and joining me are John Howard, Paul Mahoney, and Trevor Leggett. Welcome back gents. John, your second question.

John Howard:                    Yes.

Stephen Galpin:                I’m considering buying a small house close to the river. It’s the river Thames, about 30 miles outside of London. Although the house is in an area which I understand has never flooded, according to the Environment Agency report, it is in a risk area. Because of this, I’m being asked by my lender to have specific flood insurance, which is extremely costly. As the area has never flooded in the past. Can I challenge the prediction by environment agency?

John Howard:                    No.

Stephen Galpin:                Right. Oh well, that’s it.

John Howard:                    I’ve had a number of properties that I’ve looked to buy over the years, which I’ve never ever flooded. And in the end, I’ve decided not to buy them because, if there’s any research or advice given by the flood agency that it could flood in the future, you really are up against it. With building sir, with lenders. And of course that’s only going to according to them. [Crosstalk 00:15:23] it’s only going to get worse. So really, you have a… If you’re very wealthy, then I would say probably doesn’t matter to you too much and pay the extra insurance, and get on with it, and enjoy your new home. If you’re not so wealthy. I would question whether you should be buying in that area.

Stephen Galpin:                Yeah. The environment agency, do these models, don’t they?

John Howard:                    They do.

Stephen Galpin:                I think 20 year, 50 year and 100 year prediction-

John Howard:                    And they never go backwards, by the way.

Stephen Galpin:                No.

John Howard:                    So it only gets worse, not better. So I would be very cautious.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay. Paul? From a finance point of view?

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. One thing I would say some lenders will be more worried about that than others. There will be lenders that would probably ignore it. I’m sorry if they do really want the property, then that could be an option. But I agree with John. Just the fact that he hasn’t bought them for that reason means, there’s others that think the same and therefore the resale ability of that property could be limited due to that fact. But there would be ways around it if they want to buy there.

Trevor Leggett:                 But some of the West Riverside property sort of quite close to the river as well. They are up and stunning and living near a river is actually quite a nice place to live. And you’ve just got to have… You’ve got to be objective about it. It’s always a trade off. It’s a bit… When people say to me, “Dude, should you buy near the water, they flood always in the west.” But the pleasure of living near the water outweighs the risk. And you’re probably going to get [crosstalk 00:16:44]

John Howard:                    But I also think Trevor, it’s your personal situation depends on how financially strong you are. And as much the [crosstalk 00:16:53] It’s where you want to live, is what I want. I’ll buy anyway. And it’s that sort of attitude.

Stephen Galpin:                I think not Sure. Right? I used to live out to war grave near Henry [inaudible 00:17:01] and we were right on the river.

John Howard:                    Yeah. Lovely.

Stephen Galpin:                It was absolutely stunning. You have your boat outside, you can just step onto it. It’s gorgeous. But we did suffer a flood once a year at least and you just have to say, “This is the price for living here. I’m afraid.”

John Howard:                    But you… If you can afford to deal with that, that’s fine. But if you… Any slight chance that you can’t, don’t do it. Don’t do it.

Stephen Galpin:                Yeah. Flooding we see on the TV and it looks, very unfortunate and all the rest of it. But until you’ve actually experienced it, you don’t really realize how traumatic it is sometimes. Yeah.

John Howard:                    No. But also for those people who have lived there a long, long time. It’s incredibly unfortunate, but for those people that bought in the last few years, knowing that it could flood, you have… You’re not a sympathetic be honest with you, are you?

Stephen Galpin:                No. Okay. Good. Paul, onto your question. Right. I’ve collected the forms for a mortgage from my building society in readiness for applying for my first mortgage. I’ve noticed on the form that I must declare that the funds that I have for a deposit are mine and are not a loan. I guess that the building society just want to know that I’m financially sound. However, the funds I shall be using our loan from mum and dad. There is no formal loan document in place nor any particular requirement for repayment. I am concerned that if I declare it as a loan, it may affect the result of my application. Am I obliged to declare it as an agreed loan or not?

Paul Mahoney:                  You… Well, regardless of whether you declare it or not, it’s probably going to come out in the WASH anyway, because your solicitor is obliged to disclose the source of those funds to the lender. So, when you go through AML, anti money laundering checks with your solicitor, they’ll ask for ID, they’ll also ask for bank statements. And on those bank statements and they see this lump sum of cash coming into your bank account, they’re going to say, “Where’s that come from?” Now you could say, “It’s a gift.” The… If there’s no formal documents…

John Howard:                    It would be a gift from the family.

Paul Mahoney:                  Then it probably is a gift. And there’s nothing to say that it’s a loan just because your plan-

Stephen Galpin:                When do you have to watch that on tax?

John Howard:                    No. Not as a gift.

Paul Mahoney:                  Inheritance tax, perhaps if your parents were to pass away within seven years, you could potentially be liable 40% on that gift.

John Howard:                    Only if they’ve got a large…

Paul Mahoney:                  Only if they… You’ve Inherited over 300 grand or 340 grand or whatever it is.

John Howard:                    Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:                  So you do need the cost of it. Now, this person, the first time buyer, assuming they’re buying a home, most lenders would probably be okay with it being a gift from the parent. [crosstalk 00:19:36] Some may not be, but it’s probably worth checking. As they said it’s a building society. Well, it’s worth checking that with the building society. I think in these cases, this person isn’t necessarily… They’re not doing anything wrong here. So they’re best to just be upfront about it and find the right lender that has a product that is fit for purpose, as opposed to just trying to game the system because there will definitely be lenders that will be okay with it. They didn’t mention how they got to this particular building society is the best product for them, but I hope they haven’t just assumed it. That they should have got advice on the best product for them. And if that advice was given by a specialist broker, then they shouldn’t be at that building society anyway, if that’s the situation. So, seek out the right product because there will be one for them.

Stephen Galpin:                Yes. John, you and I have talked before about the bank of mum and dad. I think on a previous program-

John Howard:                    Thank goodness there is.

Stephen Galpin:                It was like mum and dad were identified as the biggest lenders in the country for mortgage purposes.

John Howard:                    Absolutely.

Stephen Galpin:                It’s about 6 billion pounds. Same sort of thing in France Trevor?

Trevor Leggett:                 Yeah, pretty much. Well, the French are obviously anti money laundering laws are exactly same as they are in the UK to Pan-European rule. The French tend not to have to worry so much about it because obviously, house prices being a lot less like they are moving across most of the country apart from the cities. You can buy a house from between 100,000 – 150,000 euros. I mean there’s only pockets where it exceeds that. So, the hundred percent lending is still common place. Interest rates are so low that most people there, their debt ratios are very low. The French have a very, very low personal debt ratio, probably one of the lowest in the world. And they’re the best savers in the world.

John Howard:                    Why is that Trevor?

Trevor Leggett:                 I don’t know. I think it’s cultural. I think they’ve always been very, very no… Very conservative. I think they’ve been taught to. I think it probably will change with time as generations move on. But for the moment they are… They’re not frivolous. They live within their means.

Stephen Galpin:                Are [crosstalk 00:21:41].

Trevor Leggett:                 I think the British are frivolous. Yeah. I think no Americans [inaudible 00:00:21:43].

John Howard:                    I think we’ve become like that over the last 10, 15, 20 years. Definitely. I think so.

Trevor Leggett:                 Well.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay.

Trevor Leggett:                 We all agree on something.

John Howard:                    We do. Well, that’s fast.

Stephen Galpin:                All right. Trevor, your last question then. We’re considering retiring to France and selling up our UK home. Obviously running costs are going to be a huge consideration as upon retirement, our income will be both fixed and indeed limited. So my question is, are there more touristy areas in France dearer in terms of local taxes and the like? I appreciate that restaurants and shopping may be more expensive in these areas, but of course that’s something that we can regulate and spend according to our budget, taxes, et cetera we cannot. So what do you think?

Trevor Leggett:                 Yeah. And there were text phones here and we text. I’ve been texting… I mean obviously text phones here has taken a bit of a hike in the last couple of years as like local… For financing of local communes budgets has been restricted from the government, so it really depends on the resources that are in the town or the village at the raw. And it changes from town to town. It depends on the spending of that particular council. I mean from French provincial towns, one to another. It can change massively. If you’ve had the council that had been in place and had been privileged.

John Howard:                    Yeah.

Trevor Leggett:                 I mean not a word today.

John Howard:                    We do.

Trevor Leggett:                 And then go on some massive ridiculous spending spree. Somebody’s got to pay the bill.

John Howard:                    Of course.

Trevor Leggett:                 And unfortunately that will result in higher text phones here. But there’s no rule geographically. It literally depends on whether you’ve had a council with a spending problem, or no.

Stephen Galpin:                You wouldn’t find it more expensive in say Nice for instance, where it’s [crosstalk 00:23:27]

Trevor Leggett:                 Well, not really. Obviously the bigger the more expensive. The property slightly higher it has, but it doesn’t really all I know. For example, Paris is extremely cheap for taxes. Ridiculously.

John Howard:                    Because there’s so many people or?

Trevor Leggett:                 No, it’s because they just don’t… It’s always been cheap. And there were towns in France [inaudible 00:23:43] close to where we are, where your local taxes be higher than they are in central Paris. So, you just need to ask what the rates are and then compare it to where it is elsewhere.

Stephen Galpin:                [inaudible 00:23:54] so do you have one?

Trevor Leggett:                 Yeah.

Stephen Galpin:                Absolutely. Okay, gent look. Just the last couple of minutes, just in one sentence each, we’re one way or another going to be coming out of Europe I think in the next month or two. What changes do you think we’re going to experience, John?

John Howard:                    I think the first two or three months will be a bit traumatic. I think fueled by the BBC and other types of social outlets in my view. Hyped up unnecessarily, irresponsibly, but I think in the long run we’ll be far, far better off sixth biggest trading nation in the world.

Stephen Galpin:                Okay.

John Howard:                    That wasn’t one sentence was it? Sorry.

Paul Mahoney:                  Well look, I think it’s happening now, so we just need to get on with it. Something I heard… A term I heard the other day which I thought was very relevant was Brexit fatigue. Everyone’s sick of it now.

John Howard:                    Yes.

Paul Mahoney:                  We just want to move on.

John Howard:                    We do.

Paul Mahoney:                  It’s obviously kept a lot of people sitting on property wise, sitting on the sidelines for some time, and what we’ve noticed is those people are coming back into the game now. They’re over waiting, and I think as this gets more and more resolved, that’s what happened-

Stephen Galpin:                It’s called boredom, isn’t it?

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. [crosstalk 00:25:00] As 30th of October passes and things start to happen, that will happen more and more, and I think that that pent up demand will return to the market, and I think the property market will pick up quite a bit over the next 12 to 18 months.

Stephen Galpin:                Trevor?

Trevor Leggett:                 Yeah, we’ve seen the sign. There’s a lot of people waiting to pounce to where the breaks are from Brexit, even buyers wanting to buy him France, we’ve got a lot of people sitting on the fence and even if Brexit happens, doesn’t have whatever. I think we are going to get a deal, and I think whether we have a vote on that deal or not, is another question but, the chances are that we are going to leave in the next few months.

John Howard:                    Sounds optimistic.

Trevor Leggett:                 Sounds good.

Stephen Galpin:                Gentlemen, thank you very much for your input today. So thank you to John Howard, Paul Mahoney and-

John Howard:                    Pleasure.

Stephen Galpin:                Trevor Leggett. Thank you all very much indeed. My name’s Stephen Galpin. Join me again next time on Property Question Time.

Speaker 6:                          Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’re ever made. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources and regardless of our experience, knowledge, or time, we can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team, and extra resources being available. Nova financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom, through property investment. With over a hundred years of experience, we shape your family’s future to invest in property with absolute confidence. Call us on 0203 8000 600, or visit nova.financial

Speaker 7:                          The antiquated village of the Rosh Basque in rural door door inn may not have the cachet of Paris or London, yet it houses one of the 10 fastest growing property consultancies in Europe. It is home to Leggett Immonilier, the leading international estate agent in France. They have around 16,000 properties for sale, right across the country with a network of 400 agents, who provide local expertise and market knowledge. If you want to know the best villages, schools, restaurants, or ballongeries, then the Leggett team will know the answer. As well as advising buyers on the local market and regional property prices, they also have a bilingual contracts team, who ensure that your purchase will go through as smoothly as possible. Leggett has been voted best estate agent in France for the past four years running. To experience these exceptional service levels for yourself, then head to our website leggettfrance.com

John Howard:                    Hi, I’m John Howard, and I’m known as a property expert. The reason for this is over the last 40 odd years, I’ve bought and sold over three and a half thousand properties, and I’m still going. I’m delighted to pass on my first experience and knowledge to you through my property seminars that are taking place across the UK this year. To know more, please go to johnhowardpropertyexpert.co.uk

Speaker 9:                          I’m Nicholas Wallwork, businessman, investor, real estate developer and entrepreneur. In my book, Investing in International Real Estate for dummies. I teach you specialist strategies you can use to build wealth and create an income through property, and real estate investing anywhere in the world. I can scare you away from the common pitfalls, and help you choose which investment strategy is right for you. This book will tell you all you need to know to grow a profitable real estate portfolio.

Stephen Galpin:                Hello and welcome to property TV. I’m Stephen Galpin, host of Property Question Time. We’ve completed the filming of series one, over 260 successful episodes. We’re now about to film series two. The difference, well, we’re going to be filming in our new studio adjacent to the Canary Wharf development. Keep those questions coming in to us. Keep our panelists, our experts busy, and we hope you enjoyed the new series, as much as you did the last one.

Speaker 8:                          Meet The Author, is a brand new mini series involving leading experts in the property industry including mentors, developers, property lawyers and other industry experts, who share insightful stories about their journey and their books. Each book is compiled by authors with years of valuable experience, tips and observations, providing you with new knowledge about the property industry. To find out more, visit the website, property-tv.co.uk/library

 

Property Question Time

Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 32 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 32 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
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Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 31 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 31 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
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Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 10 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 10 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
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Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney
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Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 6 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 6 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
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