Property TV Property Question Time S1 Ep36 - Nova

Property TV Property Question Time S1 Ep36

Jemma Forte:

Hello and welcome to Property Question Time. My name is Jemma Forte. And this is the show where you get to ask your questions to our trio of industry experts. So let’s meet who we’ve got in the hot seat today.

First up we’ve got Tomer Aboody, who is the director of MT Finance. Welcome. Then we have Paul Mahoney, the MD of Nova Financial. And last but not least, we’ve got Satyen Lakhani, the director of Off Market Invest. Welcome one and all. Okay, let’s kick things off. I’m gonna go to you first, Tomer, please, with a question which is this. “We recently come into the property flipping business and have found a good, small start up which we’re very keen to buy. However, the property will need renovating and we’ve been told a good way to go about financing this would be with a bridging loan.” And the person goes on to say they admit this type of thing isn’t really their area of expertise. Could you comment on the pros and cons?

Tomer Aboody:

So, I mean, yes it is a good option to go down the bridging loan route because it’s quicker, should be quicker, faster, and less, I suppose, evasive.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Tomer Aboody:

With regards to questionnaires and documents that have to be filled in. But most importantly, it should be more of a common sense approach behind the lender’s outlook towards the purchase. There a lot of pros and cons. I suppose, most importantly, the pros are it would be quicker. Most bridging lenders will lend on assets, which are uninhabitable. So they don’t have a kitchen or bathroom, or both. Therefore that means they can’t rent them out and therefore they can’t possible get a [inaudible 00:01:56] mortgage. As I said before, it would be quicker. The cons are really, probably it’d be slightly more expensive than a typical mortgage. But I think most importantly is as long as you go into the purchase, go into the auction house and making sure that you are actually set to be able to buy the property and you’ve built in the costs in advance, and you still believe and you still factor in that you’re gonna end up making a profit at the end of it, it’s a great opportunity to be able to use bridging finance.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Tomer Aboody:

If after you’ve built that in and you take into consideration of all the costs around you, the interest, the arrangement fees, valuation fees, legals, and it doesn’t make sense for you, then obviously just don’t buy it, unless you’ve got other means to be able to complete on the purchase.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Tomer Aboody:

Because once you’ve committed in the auction room, you’re committed to buy the property.

Jemma Forte:

And how much quicker does a bridging loan come through? Because that often is the reason for getting one isn’t it?

Tomer Aboody:

Of course. I think a typical bridging loan should usually takes about nine to 10 working days. Sometimes longer. Based on an auction, typically it’s 28 days to complete, which should give you ample time to be able to complete the transaction. Especially because once you get in auction, the full legal pack is available. So that makes it easier for the lawyers on the lender’s side to be able to have a look at the documentations, be able to have all the information in front of them, or you can also get the valuers in before your purchase, so in anticipation of being able to win the bid, that means you can actually save yourselves even more time. But I think it should take you an average 10 working days.

Jemma Forte:

Wow. Super speedy. Thank you for that, Tomer. Okay, Paul, I’m gonna move on to you now. And this person says “Someone I know would like to purchase a property I own, outright, in Wales. The property value is about 150,000, and when I purchased it, we had all the necessary searches completed. So they don’t really need all this done again. They would buy the property with cash from their own house sale, which has completed. Obviously, stamp duty would have to be paid. Would there be any other taxes to be paid? And also, do you need to pay either a solicitor or conveyancer to complete the change of title with the land registry? Or is it easy to do it yourself?” Bit of a cost cutting exercise, if I could say it.

Paul Mahoney:

There’s a few points there to cover.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

The first point is with regards to the searches. I think that would very much depend on how long ago those other searches were done.

Jemma Forte:

Right.

Paul Mahoney:

Because a lot can change.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

So it’s generally recommended that you get new searches done when you’re buying a property. I suppose this question seems to be by the seller, so it’s not so relevant to them. But to the buyer, they want to protect themselves. So that’s the first point. The second with regards to taxes. Obviously stamp duty will be payable by the new buyer. And that will differ depending on whether they’re buying it as home or whether it might be a second, or third, or fourth and so on purchase, given the recent introduction of a stamp G premium. You know, any property other than your first.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

Other taxes to potential consider, which again will be determined by whether the seller, whether this property is their primary place of residence, or whether it’s a buy select property, is potentially capital gains tax.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

Which is determined by the amount that the property price has increased. Essentially, it’s what you’re selling for, less what you paid, less any capital costs. So that might be stamp duty, any cost of renovating, anything like that. So that’s worth considering. And there’s a few things … That varies depending on the seller’s personal income, if they’re a lower rate tax payer it’s at 18%, if they’re a higher rate tax payers it’s at 28%. That’s another tax to consider and find out about. I can’t answer without that information. But the last point with regards to using a conveyancer or solicitor, it’s highly advised. In fact, you’d probably be silly not to do it.

Jemma Forte:

You’re all nodding at that one.

Tomer Aboody:

Yeah, I think it’s a point of penny smart, pound foolish at the end of the day, because it could cost you further down the line.

Jemma Forte:

I think the thing is here they’re saying “Somebody I know would like to purchase a property” and it seems like there might be a friendship going on here. So they’re looking at ways they can do it cheaply to save one another money. But what do you think?

Tomer Aboody:

I think to save possibly a few hundred pounds, ultimately it could cost you thousands of pounds further down the line. Or might be more.

Paul Mahoney:

When it comes to spending 150 grand, you know, that’s not a small amount of money for anybody.

Jemma Forte:

No, it’s not.

Paul Mahoney:

So, regardless of whether you’re buying it from your friend, you want to cover yourself.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, and I guess when they came to sell it next time, if those searches haven’t been done, could that be a red flag at that point to the next buyer?

Satyen Lakhani:

Absolutely. But I think also the fact that they might be friends, if something goes wrong, that friendship’s not going to last.

Jemma Forte:

No.

Satyen Lakhani:

So by having the conveyancer or solicitor, you’ve got a portion to blame to someone who’s a professional. They’re covered for it.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah. They say don’t buy things off friends [inaudible 00:07:13]. What if there’s a leak in the roof?

Tomer Aboody:

[inaudible 00:07:15] Don’t get involved.

Paul Mahoney:

And also, they might be buying cash now, but at some point in the future, they might want to remortgage. So covering your bases there, to make sure it is mortgageable is probably a good idea.

Jemma Forte:

Do it by the book, because all that stuff is there for a reason.

Tomer Aboody:

For sure.

Paul Mahoney:

Exactly.

Jemma Forte:

Okay, good advice. Right, Satyen, let’s go to you for this one. “Hello, I have a small amount of money that I’d like to invest in property to probably refurbish and then sell. I’m not sure how to do this and would appreciate some advice on what to do.” So I’d say maybe that comes from saying “I have a small amount of money” and want to know, is it possible?

Satyen Lakhani:

I mean, it depends on how much they’ve got. Where they’re looking to buy.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, it’s quite a sort of general question. That’s hard for you to answer.

Satyen Lakhani:

If anything, this is too general. They need to do their homework. They need to know … Or seek advice from someone who’s done this before. They need to look at mortgage issues, they need to look at legal issues, they need to look at where they should buy, they need to look at where’s there personal position in terms of if something goes wrong, have they got money to fall back on. There’s so many issues. And I think, particularly in this country, we take it for granted you buy a property and it’s as simple as that. It never is.

Jemma Forte:

No.

Satyen Lakhani:

So they need to look at and do a lot of homework. Location, professional advice, how much money they have, what they could do with that money if they didn’t buy a property. So many avenues to go for. We’re obviously property experts and we’d say “Yes, buy a property.” But without knowing their personal position, you can’t take that decision.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, advice. Because they say a little goes a long way, but actually not in property, really.

Satyen Lakhani:

No, no.

Jemma Forte:

It doesn’t, does it? There’s so many other costs that you’ve got to think about.

Tomer Aboody:

You’ve got to build them all in before you make any purchase, before you go to any auction, build the costs into it.

Jemma Forte:

Right. Yeah. And would you always say have a contingency set aside if things escalate?

Tomer Aboody:

For sure. I think anyone you call an expert will say to they’ve had themselves a situation where they assume this is going to cost them this much and it cost them that much.

Paul Mahoney:

Assume things will go wrong.

Tomer Aboody:

Yeah, you have to assume things will go wrong and most times they do unfortunately, when purchasing, or refurbishing, or developing.

Satyen Lakhani:

I think buy a property or invest in property because you’ve got money. Don’t invest in property-

Jemma Forte:

You’ve got a little bit and you want to make-

Satyen Lakhani:

That’s right.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah. That sounds like sensible advice. That does. Right. I think we should go for golden nugget. Who’s going to be first? Go on then, Tomer.

Tomer Aboody:

Really, it’s just to mention that currently in the bridging space, they’re doing a lot of second charge loans, which basically means, someone’s got a mortgage either their house, or investment asset they have. They want to borrow a bit more towards investing in their business. We’re doing a lot of that helping SME’s, those people invest into their business, launch businesses, which is helping a lot because they’re finding it quite hard to have finance given to them by the banks. And a second charge to invest towards their business, and seeing hopefully the fruit of that coming through within a year or two definitely benefits. So we’re seeing a lot of that. I would always advise anyone seeking any bridging loan, any mortgage, any second charges, to speak to a financial advisor with regards to that.

But with regards to what we’re doing, as long as you’re borrowing towards a business and predominantly it’s business related, I think it’s a good avenue to be able to help SME’s currently. And there are loans out there for two, three, four, five years.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Tomer Aboody:

Which helps a lot of people.

Jemma Forte:

Fantastic. There you go. That is a very good golden nugget. Thank you so much. Join us for more hints and tips, just of that kind, in the second part of Property Question Time. See you after this short break.

Hello and welcome back to part two of Property Question Time, with me Jemma Forte and my three industry experts. We’ve got Tomer, Pul and Satyen. Okay, we went into the break with a golden nugget and I’d like another one, frankly. So Satyen, what’s your golden nugget today?

Satyen Lakhani:

One of the questions we get asked is “Where? Where do we go to find out where to invest?” So it’s not a simple process, go to Right Move or those portals to find an investment property. So my invest to the investor is to do your homework, and seek advice. Seek advice from professionals, like your solicitors, the mortgage experts, people who you are gonna use throughout that process. And ask then about areas and which developments are gonna be the good ones to look for. Go to property shows, property exhibitions. There’s so many avenues you can go to in terms of finding out the right kind of person to work with. Network yourself, go and seek areas where you feel I want to invest in. And then go to those areas. Do your homework. Speak to the local store or something like that. Just to give yourself an idea of what that development or that area’s going to be doing.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Satyen Lakhani:

But don’t just go in blind, go into a Right Move or that kind of portal. Not that they don’t have properties there. But you’re not going to find an investment property glaring at you. You need to do your homework on that.

Jemma Forte:

Okay, fine. You gotta put the hard work in-

Satyen Lakhani:

Absolutely.

Jemma Forte:

To find those good opportunities. That sounds very wise. Okay. So we’re gonna get on with some questions now, as well, from viewers. So I’ll got back to you, Tomer. Let’s find one for you. Ah, now this person wanted to know about buying off plan and says to what extent can they be involved with what actually happens during the build?

Tomer Aboody:

[muted silence 00:12:58 – 00:13:06].

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, you’re just looking at literally a floor plan.

Tomer Aboody:

At that point I’m pretty sure there’s quite a bit of influence you can have, with regards to in terms. Whether it’s different granite, or different taps, or perhaps even certain walls being moved in certain areas. As long as it’s note external walls or something which is going to be really structural. But it’s an internal wall and you wanna make your bathroom slightly larger, or your [inaudible 00:13:33] slightly smaller, or some people I know have taken a three bedroom and it into a larger two bedroom. Because that suits them. Maybe it’s not good for an investment, but it suits them in that particular situation. So I think the earlier you come in, the more involvement you can have, and a bit more influence.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Tomer Aboody:

But I wouldn’t advise someone to say that’s always going to happen. It just really depends on the developer and development themselves.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

Just a comment on that, the changes that you might want to make should be determined by what that property’s going to be used for.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

If you’re buying it as your home, of course you’re going to tailor it to what you want and like and that’s fine if the developer will let you. If it’s a buy to let, then it’s nothing to do with what you like. It’s not about what you like. And that might seems strange, but it’s about what the target market likes. And what makes the most sense as an investment. So if that’s the case, being commercially minded and completely unemotional, not really viewing it as a property, as an investment is important.

Jemma Forte:

Okay, yeah, fair enough.

Tomer Aboody:

Don’t make it too unique.

Jemma Forte:

So don’t put like really flowery tiles in or whatever, because you like them.

Tomer Aboody:

That’s right, that’s right.

Jemma Forte:

Okay, that makes sense. Although quite nice.

Tomer Aboody:

I like flowery tiles.

Jemma Forte:

I like flowery tiles.

Tomer Aboody:

Yeah.

Jemma Forte:

I really-

Tomer Aboody:

[inaudible 00:14:47]

Jemma Forte:

And also I suppose the builder to a certain extent doesn’t want someone irritating them going “Can you move that wall? Can you do this?” All the little whims, I suppose.

Tomer Aboody:

Within reason.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, so they’ll have like a base budget where they say “Well, we’re gonna get this type of kitchen.” “If you want that type of kitchen, you gotta give us a bit more money.”

Tomer Aboody:

Correct. I think a lot of times that would work out.

Paul Mahoney:

In some cases, they won’t let you make any changes. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, okay. They’ve got like a job lot on beige paint, or something?

Tomer Aboody:

Yeah, or you trust what their I suppose interior designers have designed and said this is suitable for this particular market and in that area.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Tomer Aboody:

And that’s why they’re building it to that kind of standard and kind of level. And you see those clients because they’ve been advised that that’s gonna be the best setup.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Tomer Aboody:

So don’t go too-

Jemma Forte:

Don’t go too crazy. Yeah, I think would be tempted if it was for my house. I’d be really irritating. “Hello. Hi. I’ve got some more ideas.” They be like “Oh, God.” So-

Satyen Lakhani:

Don’t forget, sorry. The developers also has to comply with regulation as well. So what you’re buying into comes with today’s urgent requirements. They come to a higher level of standard and the more neutral it is, the more it appeals to the majority of people.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Satyen Lakhani:

Particularly if you’re going to rent, as Paul said.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, okay. Right. Paul, this one’s for you. Someone says “After my home was flooded during a flash flood incident nightmare, my insurance premiums doubled year on year. What upset me was that flooding was no longer covered and it was a huge excess for any subsidence claim.” Insurance companies, eh? “If I paid fr a full survey to be done, that showed that there was no damage, would that be a credible way of fighting for a lower premium?”

Paul Mahoney:

Potentially. Although, in my experience, when dealing with insurers, it’s kind of their word goes. They’re a bit of a law unto themselves.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

But that doesn’t mean there’s no solution. You don’t have to stay with that insurer.

Jemma Forte:

True.

Paul Mahoney:

And again, we’ve discussed this already, but the value of advice there is massive, you know? There’s so many insurers out, there’s so many different insurance products for that specific somewhat unique situation, what the best product to solve that problem would be is pretty important.

Jemma Forte:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Maybe go to a broker?

Paul Mahoney:

More than likely go to a broker and advising.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

You’d likely have to disclose what’s happened previously, but there should be some insurers that will overcome that. Especially if your premiums doubled, well you’re probably pretty high now. There might be some insurers that might be more expensive than the mainstream ones, but will cover you for what you want to be covered for.

Jemma Forte:

Okay. Okay. Difficult situation to be in.

Satyen Lakhani:

I think keep it simple, as well. Because when you get the flash flood, it’s usually not just the one property. It could be your neighbor’s as well. So find out what they’re doing.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah. Good point.

Satyen Lakhani:

Who are they insured with? You’ve got to look at all the options.

Jemma Forte:

Get together and have an insurance coffee morning.

Tomer Aboody:

Maybe their existing insurer actually agreed to cover them, so why don’t you respond to them also?

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, yeah, or you could go job lot and here you’ve got the whole street.

Tomer Aboody:

Could be.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, get a discount. That’s actually a really good idea. Okay, Satyen, question for you. Someone says “I’m considering buying a new plan, off plan.” Again, a lot of people buying off plan. “An off plan resale.” Oh. This is different. “I.e., not from the developer, but from someone that purchased the property from the developer and then stuck it on Right Move. Is this generally considered safe, and what are the associated risks?”

Satyen Lakhani:

If it’s something that the previous seller has completed, then I think you assume it like a normal transaction. So you’ll have your solicitor that will speak to their solicitor to make sure all the documentation is in order, et cetera, et cetera. And the key thing there is if it’s a new build property, built now, then you’ll have some of the guarantees that should come with it as well. The guarantees on the white goods, guarantees on the build. So all these factors, your solicitor will take advice on, or will look at the documentation and advise you on whether it’s right or wrong.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Satyen Lakhani:

So just treat it as a normal transaction. Trust your lawyers to make sure they’re doing the right work. Plus, if you’re gonna take out a mortgage, they’ll insist on that documentation anyway.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

Just a point there.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

Certainly trusting your solicitor is very important, but making sure you have the right solicitor. Because unfortunately, in my experience, some conveyancers don’t give good advice, or don’t pick certain things up. So making sure you have someone who actually knows what they’re doing.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

Because if you are relying on the advice, though you might be covered by the professional indemnity insurance, you want to be aware of what you’re doing. And that’s what their job is.

Jemma Forte:

Okay. Tell you what, just picking up on the Right Move thing, here’s a question I’d be interested in. If Right Move advertised a property and then there was something legally dubious with it, would Right Move be at all accountable? Or not?

Tomer Aboody:

I’m pretty sure not.

Jemma Forte:

You’ve got to be careful.

Tomer Aboody:

[crosstalk 00:19:49] Because I’m pretty sure that Right Move have terms and disclaimers.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah. They really can’t check all the properties that go up.

Tomer Aboody:

[crosstalk 00:19:58] It’s just depends on your own knowledge, but most importantly the correct solicitor to give you the advice to check all your documentations in advance.

Jemma Forte:

That is exactly the type of situation where, again, like you were saying, it’s about having the right professionals. Because it’s a minefield isn’t it? It’s not legally easy just for people off the street to navigate these things on their own?

Paul Mahoney:

And especially if you mind in some cases the conveyancers doesn’t necessarily cover all bases of the advice you might need.

Jemma Forte:

Right.

Paul Mahoney:

Because they don’t tend to be very commercially minded.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

They’re solicitors. They do it by the letter of the law. What’s written in black and white. And in some case, it might be worth seeking other forms of advice to interpret that.

Jemma Forte:

Okay. And also, I probably want to ask the question, why did that buyer put it on Right Move so early?

Tomer Aboody:

It could be the fact that they bought it, I suppose, put a deposit down a few years ago, the market they believe have seen has gone up in that particular area, and casing in on potential profit. As long as they’ve completed it. Sometimes there could be-

Jemma Forte:

Changing circumstances.

Tomer Aboody:

There’s also an assignable lease that they’re doing. But once again, that’s even more of a quagmire to get there. So I would advise-

Satyen Lakhani:

Yeah, even develop it further, that you’re buying that property because you like something about that. And if you’re looking at Right Move, you might find other properties. So if you’re going for that specific property, there’s something you like. So okay, go with your motive there, but get more information.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

Another potential risk on that is a lot of lenders want someone to have owned a property for a minimum of six months.

Jemma Forte:

Right.

Paul Mahoney:

Before they’ll let you buy it from them with a mortgage to avoid flip type situations, with [inaudible 00:21:35]. That’s following a lot of issues that we’ve run into in the previous financial crisis with major uplifts in value and then major dips in value. So considering that as well.

Jemma Forte:

Okay, thank you. Right, last but not least, we’ve got one more golden nugget. Paul, I’m looking at you.

Paul Mahoney:

Got one. So as of 30th of September.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

So, a few days ago. The Prudential Regulatory Authority, the PRA, has brought in new regulations for lending to portfolio landlords. So that’s anybody who owns more than four properties. And the regulations are with regards to providing more information. Pretty well all lenders have interpreted them differently. But the standard is that essentially professional landlord would need to have business plans in place. Some will need to have cash flow analysis. So there’s more of a professional approach to having a portfolio of properties.

Jemma Forte:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Paul Mahoney:

So that’s important if are a professional landlord, if you’re planning to be a professional landlord, that you understand what your requirements are there for being able to get finance. And that, I suppose, you go down the right avenues to not get yourself into trouble. Because things will be different to what they were not so long ago.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah. It’s amazing how the laws change very quickly, within your world. Can’t almost keep up.

Paul Mahoney:

Yeah.

Jemma Forte:

Do you find it’s something … Because you’ve got so many different layers of expertise, do you find it quite difficult to keep on top of, or do you have to hire other people to keep on top of it.

Tomer Aboody:

I think like anyone, everyone gets advice.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

Yeah.

Tomer Aboody:

You have to. You make sure you stay on top of them and make sure you abide by them. If anything, I suppose it should protect the consumer, the investor, and if that’s the issues, then it’s a good thing.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Tomer Aboody:

It is quite a lot being thrown at you, but it’s making sure you’re up to date with them.

Paul Mahoney:

It’s definitely you wanna have your finger on the pulse. You can’t rest on your laurels in this industry. You need to be aware of what’s happening.

Jemma Forte:

Keep reading.

Satyen Lakhani:

You’re always learning.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Satyen Lakhani:

Always learning.

Jemma Forte:

And I guess property lawyers are always working.

Tomer Aboody:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

Yeah.

Jemma Forte:

That’s always what I tell my kids to do.

Tomer Aboody:

Very hard.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah, definitely.

Tomer Aboody:

Definitely a good profession.

Jemma Forte:

Exactly. Right, any last words of wisdom before we go? Anybody wanna pop anything else in off the back of the golden nugget?

Satyen Lakhani:

I think the one thing we all agree on is homework and have the right advice.

Jemma Forte:

That seems to be the thread that is coming through. That these days, there’s not an easy buck to be made. You’ve got to really research.

Tomer Aboody:

A lot of things online, on TV, make you believe that it’s just easy. It’s not as easy as it looks.

Jemma Forte:

No.

Tomer Aboody:

Make sure you get advice throughout the process. Whether it’s through financial advisor, the lawyers, the developers, people around you, see what others have done, and make sure you can afford it, I suppose.

Jemma Forte:

Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:

I think another important point is because we’ve been talking a lot about advice and buyer beware and potentially some negative things, which may turn people off but shouldn’t. An important point is there’s still a lot of money to be made and retained within property.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

The property market, in my opinion, is still without doubt, the best asset class, for the vast majority of people.

Jemma Forte:

Okay.

Paul Mahoney:

So it’s still a good investment. Don’t believe the hype about buy to let being dead, because it’s not. But make sure that you’re doing it right.

Jemma Forte:

Okay. Great advice. Take professional advice and go for it if you think you can afford it, is the message. Yes. Measured, but have fun. Right, that’s it for today’s Property Question Time, and if you’ve got questions, you’re thinking “I would love to ask them this.” Well then you can. You need to go to our website, which is www.property-tv.co.uk and have a look at things there. Or email us directly info@property-tv.co.uk. It’s been a joy. My name’s Jemma Forte and thank you to my three guests Satyen Lakhani, Paul Mahoney, and our lovely Tomer Aboody. Thank you so much for watching, and we’ll see you next time.

Property Question Time

Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep148
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep148
read more
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep147
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep147
read more
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep146
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep146
read more
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep145
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep145
read more
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep139
Property TV | Property Question Time S1 Ep139
read more
Want to be the first to know what’s going on in the world of property investment? Subscribe to our newsletter below.
Get in Touch

Book a complimentary property and/or finance consultation

back-to-top