Property TV - Property Question Time - S1 Ep 204 - Paul Mahoney, Johanna Leggett and John Howard - Nova

Property TV – Property Question Time – S1 Ep 204 – Paul Mahoney, Johanna Leggett and John Howard

Stephen Galpin: Hello and welcome to Property Question Time. This is the program where you can have your property related questions answered by our team of property experts. My name’s Stephen Galpin and with me today are Paul Mahoney, welcome Paul. You’re founder and CEO of Nova Financial Group. Joining us all the way from France today, flown in specially; thank you very much Johanna, Johanna Leggett of Leggett Immobilier based in France, welcome. And John Howard, John welcome back, a regular participant in our program, property developer, author and, of course, Property TV elevator angel, welcome.

John Howard: Thank you.

Stephen Galpin: The first question will go to Paul, and it’s this, “I’m considering entering the buy-to-let market. Am I better off looking at buying off-plan and waiting for delivery of the property? Or, buying something that’s not new and may need refurbishment?”

Paul Mahoney: It’s a fairly broad question in that there’s a very broad scope of off-plan properties, there’s also a very broad scope of refurbishment properties. I’d say the first thing to consider is how much of your time do you want to put into this? Off-plan is pretty well fully passive, aside from the research you do in selecting the property there’s nothing you need to do thereafter from a hands-on perspective. Whereas, of course, with refurbishment there is.

Paul Mahoney: I think a lot of people watch too many TV shows about refurbishment and assume it’s really easy to create-

Stephen Galpin: And takes a couple of weeks, yes.

Paul Mahoney: Yeah, exactly. You just turn over all this profit from “refurbishing” the property. Obviously, there’s a broad scope of what refurbishing means as well. The answer really depends on the person, I think, and what their skills are, what their goals are, what they’ve done in the past.

Paul Mahoney: Off-plan, in the right circumstances, can work really well, and I’ve seen it work really well for myself and others in the right circumstances. Then, there’s also some really risky off-plan properties out there, which you would really want to avoid. You need to understand the difference between those two things.

Paul Mahoney: The same applies to refurbishment. It’s not that easy to just go and make a fortune out of refurbishing properties, and you don’t want to buy a lemon that you think you can turn into a diamond because you probably can’t. If you don’t understand the difference between a lemon and a diamond in the rough then you probably aren’t going to do very well from that either.

Stephen Galpin: Don’t do it.

Paul Mahoney: Yeah, exactly. I suppose you need to understand what your options are, what your skill set is, what your goals are, how much time you have to apply to that investment, and then make the decision that’s the best for you. There’s definitely not one answer to that question depending on this person’s situation.

Stephen Galpin: I suppose, one of the other difficulties is that if you’re buying off-plan you’ve got to anticipate what the rental market will be like at the point of completion of your property, which may be one or two years ahead.

Paul Mahoney: That’s exactly right. I suppose, if you’re investing in an off-plan property you need to have confidence in that location being in a better position, or at least the same position as when you’re investing.

Stephen Galpin: John, I’m guessing there that the advantage of buying off-plan … you know my views on that, but I think the advantage would be that you do have a new, clean, fresh property, with which to let.

John Howard: Yeah, you do. I think, to be fair, Paul’s done a great job in answering that question because it’s a massive question. I have to say, buying off-plan for a lot people, I believe, is lazy property investing because it’s very simple, obviously, very simple to do. You’re following the crowd, you’re following what everyone else is doing, and that is fine if you haven’t got a lot of time to spare, and also if you’ve done your research. Like you said, 18 months time do we know what the market’s going to be like? Are there other developments in the area that are going to help this development that you’re investing in get better, and be worth more?

John Howard: It’s very important to do your research just because you’re buying off-plan don’t be a lazy investor. Still do the same amount of work, due diligence you’d do if you’re buying something to refurbish yourself, very important. The service charge on a block of flats, for instance, is vital to know what that is and that it’s genuine, and that it’s not going to suddenly go up after the first year by 50% or something. Do your research.

Stephen Galpin: You know when you’re buying from plan that is usually the case, isn’t it? The first two years are pretty low because the-

John Howard: Not on every development.

Stephen Galpin: Not on yours.

John Howard: I didn’t say that. I just said not on every development.

Stephen Galpin: Right, okay. Johanna, would the same criteria apply in France perhaps?

Johanna Leggett: Well, it’s quite different in France with Brits buying in France because most of the off-plan that they’re buying is for holiday homes, so it’s not necessarily an investment. Although they will rent them out, generally speaking, most of the Brits we sell to are actually buying to use it as a holiday home themselves. It would really depend because France isn’t a huge country for making investment unless you’re buying in cities. It’s really a lifestyle choice to buy in France. It’s quite different, I think, to the UK.

Stephen Galpin: Different set of goals, really. Okay, great stuff.

Stephen Galpin: Johanna, now, we’re going to move on to you now for your first question, “I’ve often thought about moving to an older style property in France but I don’t know how I would deal with the general issues that could crop up if I bought an older property things like mold, damp walls, insurance of utilities, even asbestos. I don’t want to get into something I would regret especially as I speak no French at all. Are there any safety measures I could rely on as an overseas buyer?

Johanna Leggett: Well, first of all, I’d choose a very good agent that will help you through the process, of course, but France is quite a safe country to buy in. The French themselves don’t actually do surveys when they’re buying a property, but there are five standard tests that are done. One is for asbestos, so it checks to find out where the asbestos is. It doesn’t necessarily mean you can withdraw from the sale if the property has asbestos but it will highlight where it is, so if it needs to be removed you’re aware because it might be in a chimney pot, it might be on an old barn roof, or something like that. They also do an electrical test, so the electrics are all tested and, if there is any problems with it, it’s highlighted before the purchase of the property, before the [French 00:06:31] is actually signed, which is like the exchange of contracts.

Johanna Leggett: The sewage is also checked to see whether it conforms to the new regulations because, generally speaking, the older style properties are probably in the countryside and they’re not mains drains like we’re used to. They also have a termites test, which will determine whether there’s any termites. Termites is one reason that you can withdraw from a sale if the property does have termites because that can be quite serious, although it can be treated, but it might just highlight that there’s a bit of woodworm there that needs to be treated et cetera.

Johanna Leggett: With the language barrier, don’t worry. Thousands of British people have been buying in France for centuries, and there’s always help at hand. There are British surveyors that live in France that speak the language as well that can help if you are worried about property. They even do a two-hour walk around service with you, completely different to what they do in the UK but there’s, certainly, lots of help at hand. You are generally made aware of any problems before you have to sign anything and, also, there’ll be plenty of people at hand including an agent that will be able to help you for insurance and things like that as well.

Stephen Galpin: Johanna, you mentioned the five various tests, who is it that performs those tests? Is it some kind of local authority, or is it a commercial company that undertakes them?

Johanna Leggett: They are commercial companies, they work in conjunction with the [not-aires 00:07:54]. They’re diagnostic tests, and so it’s a diagnostic company that can perform those tests as such. They’re, obviously, all legalized and those tests are then sent to the [not-aire 00:08:04] who will go through them, they’ll have a cover sheet that shows the conclusions of every single test, and that is actually part of the legal document that the [not-aire 00:08:14] will draw up before the sale can go through.

Stephen Galpin: Now, you mentioned just at one point, I think, it was termites where you said well, that’s an opportunity to withdraw from the sale. The situation in this country, as you well know, is that if you exchange contracts then you’re pretty well stuck in the contract. What’s the point of no return under the French system?

Johanna Leggett: It’s completely different. You can exchange contracts, say, within three or four days if all the diagnostic tests are in and that the [not-aire 00:08:42] has them, or the agent has then because an agency in France can also draw up a [French 00:08:46]. Then, you have a 10 day cooling off period, so if you want to withdraw for any reason you can do without any consequence, after the 10 days you have to send your 10% deposit. Generally speaking, the termite test is only valid for three months, so if the sale goes on longer than three months it has to be redone, and if the termites turn up suddenly, or have just arrived with their suitcases you can, obviously, withdraw from the sale just on the termites but for any other reason if you withdraw from the sale just because you decided two months down the line you don’t want to buy it you would be liable to lose your 10% deposit.

Stephen Galpin: Okay great, thank you for that then Johanna.

Stephen Galpin: John, your first question.

John Howard: Yes?

Stephen Galpin: “There’s a convenience store for sale in our village, which comes with two stories of accommodation. Normally, the owner would live above shop, but I wouldn’t want to do that. The village is near a commuter railway station, so I’m thinking of taking this shop and converting it into two apartments. As it’s not more than four occupants I think it’s not something that would require HMO consent, but are there regulations I should be aware of when converting it?”

John Howard: Good question. The first thing is you want to make sure that it has a separate entrance to the shop, of course, because if it hasn’t you need to create that. That’s, obviously, vitally important.

John Howard: Sounds like they need to get planning permission to convert the residential accommodation above to two self-contained flats, and if they do have to do that, which I think they will do, that will [inaudible 00:10:18] all the fire precautions required and so on under the council permission. Apply for planning permission, get the planning permission, convert the properties correctly as to the planning commission, get the complete certificate from local authority, and you’re all set to go.

Stephen Galpin: Okay great.

Stephen Galpin: Paul, any difficulties with funding apartments above shops?

Paul Mahoney: Lenders are always looking at anything that is going to deter a tenant from wanting to live there. A typical one is a flat above a curry house. No one wants the smell of a curry house wafting through their apartment, some people might, but most people wouldn’t, so that is something that could raise issues. I suppose, if it was a convenience store perhaps that’s not a problem, but the risk is it could change into something else.

John Howard: Also, a convenience store could be open until 11 at night, which could be a problem to be fair, so the clue is in the word convenience, isn’t it really? So it can be a problem, but Paul’s absolutely right regarding if you’re looking to sell the flats above a shop the first floor above a shop is always more difficult to sell for a number of reasons, one of them being the finance.

Paul Mahoney: Yeah and there’s lenders that will do it but there’s lenders that won’t.

Stephen Galpin: Ladies and gents, thank you very much that’s all we’ve got time for in this half of the program. Join us shortly after the break.

Speaker 5: The antiquated village of La Rochebeaucourt in rural Dordogne may not have the cachet of Paris or London yet, it houses one of the 10 fastest growing property consultancies in Europe. It is home to Leggett Immobilier, the leading international estate agent in France. They have around 16,000 properties for sale right across the country with a network of 400 agents who provide local expertise and market knowledge. If you want to know the best villages, schools, restaurants, or [boul-angeries 00:12:21] then the Leggett team will know the answer. As well as advising buyers on the local market and regional property prices, they also have a bilingual contract team who ensure that your purchase will go through as smoothly as possible.

Speaker 5: Leggett has been voted best estate agent in France for the past four years running. To experience these exceptional service levels for yourself then head to our website, leggettfrance.com.

Speaker 6: Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources and, regardless of our experience, knowledge or time. We can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team and extra resources being available. Nova Financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom through property investment. With over 100 years of experience we shape your family’s future.

Speaker 6: To invest in property with absolute confidence, call us on 0203-8000-600 or visit nova.financial.

John Howard: My name is John Howard, and I’ve been investing and developing properties for over 40 years. In that time, I’ve been very successful but, of course, I always made the odd mistake as well. In my book, I explain how to be successful and what to do should something go wrong. I’ve survived three property recessions, I can help you do the same.

John Howard: My book is available online, please go to johnhowardpropertyexpert.co.uk.

Stephen Galpin: Hello and welcome back to Property Question Time. I’m Stephen Galpin and joining me are Paul Mahoney, Johanna Leggett, and John Howard. Welcome back guys.

Stephen Galpin: Paul, your second question, “If I buy and let out a property purchased with a buy-to-let mortgage and my circumstances change, what are the financial consequences if I move into the property and make it my home?”

Paul Mahoney: Financial consequences? Well, there’s a few things you need to do to be able to do that. You can’t just go and live in it, that would be breaking the terms of the buy-to-let mortgage. Some people do that and it’s called a backdoor buy-to-let. The reason for that term is it’s easier to get a buy-to-let mortgage than it is to get a residential mortgage, they’re less regulated and the serviceability is based upon the rent the property generates as opposed to your personal income. When you buy a home it’s all about the multiple of your income, so far as how much you can borrow whereas when you go for a buy-to-let it’s all about the rent from the property. Of course, if you then move into that property and it’s not generating any rent then you’re the only one servicing the mortgage. Some people try to do the to do that and lenders are quite onto it. They look at things like how close the buy-to-let is to your work, if it’s closer than your home and bigger than your home they’ll likely ask a lot of questions.

Paul Mahoney: Doesn’t seem like that’s what this person’s doing, but they do need to be careful. They can’t just go and move into it, they do need to change the mortgage. At the very least, ask the lender’s permission, they’ll probably say no, and they’ll probably make you remortgage the property either with them or a different lender onto a residential mortgage.

Stephen Galpin: Right okay. How strict would they be … you’re talking about the two different levels of qualification for your mortgage, financial qualification that is. What happens if you said to them, “Well look, I’m a little bit strapped for cash. I can’t run the two homes, I need to just cut down to one,” Will they let you keep the same lending criteria as the buy-to-let, if you’re going to change it? Or, are they going to be really strict and-

Paul Mahoney: No, the criteria will change completely because buy-to-let mortgages are considered commercial mortgages, so they’re made on the basis that you’re using them for the purposes of business. There’s some level of assumption that in doing that you can kind of know what you’re doing and therefore they’re slightly less regulated. Whereas with a residential mortgage it’s very much a consumer mortgage and therefore there’s higher levels of regulation applied to them.

Paul Mahoney: Just to answer the question simply, the consequences is if you went and did that without asking the lender, the lender would have the right to recall the mortgage on the spot, so that could be disastrous. Effectively, you would need to speak with the lender, tell them what you’re planning to do, and the likely outcome is they would tell you, “We’re going to need to remortgage that property to be able to move into it.”

Stephen Galpin: Same sort of thing in France, Johanna?

Johanna Leggett: Probably exactly the same, yes. I can’t advise on mortgages because we’re, obviously, just selling, but I think it is exactly the same.

John Howard: I can’t believe all that.

Stephen Galpin: You can’t believe what [inaudible 00:17:14]?

John Howard: I can’t believe all that. I know it’s true, but surely if someone’s paying the mortgage and there’s no problem with it … I can understand why you have to inform them, of course, you must do so, that you’re moving into it, but would they really force you to refinance the whole …? Or, will they just charge you a higher interest rate, Paul? [crosstalk 00:17:33].

Paul Mahoney: The issue is the lender would effectively be breaking the rules if they let you go and move into it because they wouldn’t have fulfilled all the legislative requirements to give a residential mortgage on that property.

John Howard: Now, how long will they give you to … I’m doing your job now, sorry.

Paul Mahoney: It really depends on the lender, but I’m quite confident the lender would get in trouble if they allowed you to [crosstalk 00:18:00] move into it as your primary place of residence.

John Howard: Will they give you six months or something like that to refinance?

Paul Mahoney: They might do. I have come across quite a lot of people doing this and a lot of the time it’s something you don’t really want to hear because it’s something you’re supposed to report.

Stephen Galpin: I suppose this is, again, part of the government’s reasoning for trying to professionalize the letting market.

John Howard: Totally, I agree in total, and it needs to be professionalized because we’re all paying tax. Some of these people aren’t paying tax on the rents and their profit they’re making. By selling the property on they’re not paying tax and they should be, so I think the government’s doing the right thing.

Paul Mahoney: Just one other comment on the question as well. I think this person’s looking at it the wrong way, if they’re buying a buy-to-let they shouldn’t be buying that as a potential place they might have to move into in the future because that’s probably not the best investment, but it’s also not the right frame of mind. Obviously, you want to account for down sides but, in my opinion, you should really be separating your investments from your personal life. [crosstalk 00:19:03].

Stephen Galpin: I’ve listened to you on many programs and you’ve always been very clear that you have to approach this as a business, nothing else.

John Howard: Always. Property is a business end of, whether you’ve got 1 property or 100, it’s a business.

Stephen Galpin: Okay lovely, thank you.

Stephen Galpin: Johanna, “I’ve recently developed an attraction to central, that’s coastal, France and …” I don’t know is coastal, central France?

Johanna Leggett: No, it’s not actually.

Stephen Galpin: It’s a bit of a contradiction really.

Johanna Leggett: Central’s right in the middle, yeah [crosstalk 00:19:32]. I’m presuming halfway down France on the coast.

Stephen Galpin: Let’s go with coastal, that’s much more interesting. “I’ve developed an attraction for coastal France and I’m considering investing in property there. Not too far south, but warmer than the UK. Are there any good places to consider right now? Not to commercial yet with the potential providing a yield?”

Johanna Leggett: Well, I’m presuming that the person isn’t going to be using it themselves, but then saying that if they’re looking at halfway down France quite warm and stuff it sounds like they might want to use it as a holiday home themselves. In those instances, if it’s going to be just for investment and you’re just going to rent it out then I would go for towns like university towns et cetera, La Rochelle, Vannes, for example, where you will get yield all year round, and the yield’s, probably in those areas, around 6%.

Johanna Leggett: If you’re looking for holiday yields, or whatever it can be slightly higher but, again, I would choose the big touristy towns. Halfway down you’re probably looking from southern Brittany, which has the Gulf stream, so you get really lovely warm weather, all the way down to sort of the [French 00:20:41]. Some really good islands are, Île de [Lau-rent 00:20:45], and Île de Ré, which are quite expensive but they do provide high yields because you’ve got a lot of Parisians renting there, a lot of [Bordelaise-s 00:21:10], people coming from [Bor-des 00:20:55] to rent holiday homes there.

Johanna Leggett: The season can only generally run between April and September, so it’s not huge, but they are quite high rentals in those seasons.

Stephen Galpin: Interestingly enough, there’s two contradictions in that question, isn’t there really? One is the central and the coastal and the other one, of course, they’re talking about investment high yields and yet they’re saying, “Well, I’ve got an attraction for …,” and I think, as we said in an early question, it should be a business whether it’s here or in France. You have to take a cold clinical decision, don’t you? It’s either going to be nice for you, or it’s going to be good for your tenants.

John Howard: I’ve got some information about La Rochelle, if I may just share that with you?

Johanna Leggett: Of course.

John Howard: I cycled there and from Ipswich, it’s 498 miles. Lovely place, by the way.

Johanna Leggett: It is actually.

John Howard: Lovely place.

Johanna Leggett: It is actually.

Paul Mahoney: Is that information or is that showing off?

John Howard: That’s just information. [crosstalk 00:21:48]

Stephen Galpin: That was yesterday, was it?

John Howard: No, it was last year.

Johanna Leggett: I think as well with towns like La Rochelle, for example, you do have all the cheap airlines flying into there as well, so the Brits have a holiday-

John Howard: That wasn’t the reason we went there, of course.

Johanna Leggett: Well, you cycled, obviously.

John Howard: We flew back.

Johanna Leggett: It is very, very popular with British. Again, Vannes is very cosmopolitan because you have the yacht race starting from there, et cetera in Southern Brittany. They’re all very popular areas and very, very easy to rent out.

Stephen Galpin: Okay great stuff. Well John, thank you for sharing that [crosstalk 00:22:19]. We’ll now move onto your question.

John Howard: Very good.

Stephen Galpin: “I’m not really sure what the best choice is for my wife and I. We’re aiming to get on the housing ladder albeit a bit late in life.” Well …, “As my wife is now 30 and I’m in my early 40s.” That’s not too late, is it? That’s quite normal these days. “We have one child and another one on the way. House prices are very high where we live, so help to buy or shared ownership appears to be the only realistic option for us. For the size of property we need the mortgage is affordable but need somehow to raise a good deposit. We can’t temporarily move in with our parents, we don’t have any inheritance, or anything like that, so are there any other ways of us financing the deposit to open the door for us?”

John Howard: Well, this is quite a common problem for a lot of people, and what I would say, don’t be overambitious really. They say they live in an expensive area well, all due respect, you may want to move slightly further out from where you are into a slightly cheaper area. Don’t make life so hard for yourself that you will never do it, that’s the first thing to do.

John Howard: The second thing, I think, they say they haven’t got any family who can help at all with the deposit, is that what they’re saying?

Stephen Galpin: Yes.

John Howard: Yeah, and that is obviously a problem, so I would go to some housing associations, see what schemes there are available for shared ownership where, perhaps, you’re not putting a deposit in initially, and that you can buy more of the property as the years progress.

John Howard: To be honest with you, Paul might have one or two ideas on this as well because that’s your-

Stephen Galpin: Just before I go to Paul on this, I know, John, that you’re quite a fan of government help to buy schemes, aren’t you?

John Howard: Yes.

Stephen Galpin: I’ve always been rather skeptical.

John Howard: You have, yes.

Stephen Galpin: Do you want to just spell out very quickly and simply how they work, and how they might help these people?

John Howard: Well, the help to buy scheme is a wonderful scheme brought in by the UK government where they’ve made £10 billion available for first-time buyers. Obviously, with first-time buyers there’s also, now, no stamp duty, which is another great thing. They made 10 billion available, and depending where you are in the area, depending how much deposit they will give, in London they will put up a 40% deposit, which you don’t have to pay any interest on or anything for five years. It depends where you are in the country, it varies how much deposit they will allow you to put. You’d normally got to find 5% yourself but, as I said, to be honest with you …

Stephen Galpin: There you are, you see, I’ve always said move to London. Paul, what have you got to add?

Paul Mahoney: John took the words out of my mouth. Help to buy is a great scheme for first-time buyers. One of the guys in our office has just used it, he’s bought a £500,000 property in London with a £25,000 deposit. The stamp duty is only waived by the government up to 300 grand, but the developer paid the 15 grand over and above that, so literally 25,000. Usually, he would’ve had to have 50 plus stamp duty, so that’s what? 70,000? 75,000 would’ve had to been the deposit in the past, now, it’s 25. He can afford that £275,000 mortgage that he’s taken on, and he’s got five years of the interest only equity loan, or 10 years with a little bit of interest added on for the final five, so that’s helped that person, which probably would’ve really struggled to save the 75 to get into the market and to work toward owning that property outright.

Stephen Galpin: Okay great. Well, that’s all we’ve got time for today, so thank you all very much. Paul Mahoney, thank you. Johanna Leggett, thank you. And John Howard, many thanks to you too.

John Howard: Pleasure.

Stephen Galpin: Join us again next time on Property Question Time.

Speaker 7: If you have any questions you’d like to send to the experts at Property Question Time you can submit them via our website, on social media, or email us on info@propertytelevision.co.uk.

Speaker 5: The antiquated village of La Rochebeaucourt in rural Dordogne may not have the cachet of Paris or London, yet it houses one of the 10 fastest growing property consultancies in Europe. It is home to Leggett Immobilier, the leading international estate agent in France. They have around 16,000 properties for sale right across the country with a network of 400 agents who provide local expertise and market knowledge. If you want to know the best villages, schools, restaurants, or [boul-angeries 00:12:21] then the Leggett team will know the answer. As well as advising buyers on the local market and regional property prices, they also have a bilingual contract team who ensure that your purchase will go through as smoothly as possible.

Speaker 5: Leggett has been voted best estate agent in France for the past four years running. To experience these exceptional service levels for yourself then head to our website, leggettfrance.com.

Speaker 6: Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources and, regardless of our experience, knowledge or time. We can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team and extra resources being available. Nova Financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom through property investment. With over 100 years of experience we shape your family’s future.

Speaker 6: To invest in property with absolute confidence, call us on 0203-8000-600 or visit nova.financial.

John Howard: Hi, I’m John Howard, and I’m known as the property expert. The reason for this is over the last 40 odd years I’ve bought and sold over 3 1/2 thousand properties and I’m still going. I’m delighted to pass on my vast experience and knowledge to you through my property seminars that are taking place across the UK this year. To know more, please go to johnhowardpropertyexpert.co.uk.

Speaker 8: The tax system has evolved significantly over recent years for property investors and developers. You may think that you and your accountant have a grip on these changes, however, unless you’re receiving specialist tax advice from a specialist tax advisory firm then it’s unlikely to be the case.

Speaker 8: At ETC Tax our team of highly experienced charted tax advisors work with private individuals and companies to deliver effective tax planning whilst meeting HMRC compliance requirements. Let us help you to meet your personal or commercial objectives in the most tax efficient manner. ETC Tax, making the complex simple.

Property Question Time

Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 32 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 32 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 31 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 31 – Richard Bush and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 10 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 10 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 9 – John Howard, Angela Worral and Paul Mahoney
read more
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 6 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
Property TV – Property Question Time – S2 EP 6 – John Howard and Paul Mahoney
read more
Want to be the first to know what’s going on in the world of property investment? Subscribe to our newsletter below.
The property pension plan book icon

Take Control Of Your Future With Buy To Let Investment, get The Property Pension Plan for Free!

Find Out More
Get in Touch

Book a complimentary property and/or finance consultation

back-to-top