Proper Wealth - S2 Episode 5: Property as a Secure Asset Class - John Howard (Property Developer) - Nova

Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 5: Property as a Secure Asset Class – John Howard (Property Developer)

Paul Mahoney:                  Hi, I’m Paul Mahoney, and welcome to Proper Wealth, the show where we discuss all things wealth creation with a focus on property. Joining me today is John Howard.

John Howard:                    Hi, Paul.

Paul Mahoney:                  Property developer, author, speaker.

John Howard:                    Thank you.

Paul Mahoney:                  And we’re talking about property as a secure asset class.

John Howard:                    Yep.

Paul Mahoney:                  Do you think we’ll both agree that it is?

John Howard:                    It is.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah.

John Howard:                    End of show.

Paul Mahoney:                  That’s it. We’re done.

John Howard:                    We’re done.

Paul Mahoney:                  Right. Let’s start from the beginning and say, if we’re saying it’s secure, what are we comparing it to?

John Howard:                    What I would compare it to stocks and shares. I would compare it to gold. I would compare it to diamonds perhaps. What do you think? What else could we compare it to?

Paul Mahoney:                  Okay. In my mind, in my background being financial planning, I only really view investments as something that generates both income. Well, at least something that generates income.

John Howard:                    Yeah, I agree with that.

Paul Mahoney:                  And ideally, the potential for capital appreciation as well. So therefore-

John Howard:                    I think the appreciation is really, really important in that. Really important.

Paul Mahoney:                  So I suppose, therefore, in my mind, that’s sort of interest bearing investments, equities, as you say, and property. I would categorize things like diamonds and gold and that sort of thing as a commodity and therefore more of a speculation as opposed to investment. But I suppose that just depends on your definition of investment.

John Howard:                    Well, I would say that, allegedly, diamonds have never ever gone down in value.

Paul Mahoney:                  Fair enough.

John Howard:                    Now, whether they manipulate the market a bit to make sure that happens. Gold has, of course. Gold, we all know that if there’s any turbulence, the value of gold goes up, and if it’s an easy, lovely, everyone’s doing well, it goes down. And actually, you could consider the central London property market, up until now, as being like gold because people find investors would always invest in the UK, mainly the very smart bits of the UK accept that, and Mayfair would be an example of that because there’s turbulence everywhere else and they know it’s incredibly safe. They’re going to be safe, and more importantly, their money’s going to be safe.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, I agree. I’ve got some numbers on that, as far as the most recent financial crisis that we had in 2008. Obviously, that was directly property linked, was credit crunch. So, the total average downturn across the UK was 16%, so it’s about 8% in 2008 and about 8% in 2009, on average across the UK.

John Howard:                    That’s a bit disappointing if you want to take advantage of it like I did.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Well, I’m sure there was lots of properties that were massively under-

John Howard:                    And there was some harder than that. And we’ve got a portfolio in Brighton for instance, and Brighton never went down, it stayed the same. And other places of course went down more. So, the property world, the property market, especially in the UK, is a, and I heard you say this before, Paul, actually, it’s a micro… What’s the word? Microcosm?

Paul Mahoney:                  Microclimate?

John Howard:                    Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah.

John Howard:                    So, there’s like probably 500 different areas of which can all be slightly different for one reason or another, and of course it’s picking those areas and being smart about it. And there’s an area near me on the Suffolk/Norfolk border [inaudible 00:03:38] which is mainline to London, and that went up 10% last year.

Paul Mahoney:                  Right. Yeah. Yeah. So, I think what you’ve heard me say in the past, it’s important to understand the micro economics of specific locations rather than looking at the UK property market as a whole. Because, in my opinion, there’s not really such a thing, because lots of people at the moment… For example, we were in London today, and you speak with London people, they seem to think there’s nowhere else in the world.

John Howard:                    There isn’t anywhere else [inaudible 00:04:08] according to them. Some of them don’t know anywhere but Mayfair, Paul, so we’re doing well if if they think it’s the whole of London.

Paul Mahoney:                  But that’s the thing. And therefore, because the London market has been stagnating recently, they think the UK market is, and that’s not necessarily the case in all cities.

John Howard:                    Not at all. I would agree. And I know over the years, I mean I’ve been at it 40 years, and over the years I’ve spread my investment across the UK, really. That was partly because I just felt that I couldn’t get enough of the right deals and the right margins just sticking to such a small area. But over the years, of course, that’s [inaudible 00:04:44] good stead. That’s how old I am, Paul. In the ’92 slow down, property recession, 1992, we had blocks of flats in the Midlands and they went down 15%. East Anglia went down 35%, so you can see by spreading your risk around the place can make a huge difference.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Of course.

John Howard:                    And could it help you survive the recession. I’ve survived three.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Yeah. So, a bit of diversification is a good thing.

John Howard:                    Yeah, within the market. Definitely.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. I agree. One thing I would point out, though, with diversification, because you hear that a lot, you hear a lot of people wanting to spread their money as far as they can go.

John Howard:                    It just depends how much you’ve got.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, I agree. And I suppose that’s what I’m getting at is, we spoke with some people that they might have a couple of hundred thousand and they want to get four or five properties with that and really spread it quite thin, but then they’re going into cheaper properties, cheaper areas, that sort of thing, and just diversifying for the sake of it, as opposed to it being a good investment and then buying another good investment that just so happens to be in a different location.

John Howard:                    Yeah. And I think, also, over the years, the deals I’ve done, and I’ve done many, many, many deals, if you force that deal, if you force it to work, there’s a balance between driving a deal forward and driving it to completion, and also allowing it to work naturally for you. And if it doesn’t work naturally for you, going back to what you were saying about the guy’s got 200 grand, he’s trying to force this force that, it doesn’t work.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. No, I agree.

John Howard:                    Bit of patience and I’m not… Listen, I’m a deal junkie and I’ve got no patience, but you learn to be patient because if you’re not patient in property, it can cost you a lot of money.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, I agree. I spoke about the total downturn in property, and you said that is disappointing and [crosstalk 00:06:34].

John Howard:                    For me it’s disappointing because I want-

Paul Mahoney:                  For you it’s disappointing trying to get the better deal.

John Howard:                    Yeah, I want to get a better deal.

Paul Mahoney:                  But when you think about it, 16% is a small downturn, isn’t it, in a major financial crisis? If you compare that to the [inaudible 00:06:44] your share index, that fell by 32% just in 2008. So, more than double, well actually exactly double, the total property down [inaudible 00:06:52].

John Howard:                    And may I say I’ve never been any good at shares, so every time I’ve invested in shares it’s a disaster. And if you’re a stockbroker, you don’t want me as a client because I can tell you why… It went badly. So, I’ve never done it. I’ve never done very well with shares at all.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. And I suppose that there is a pretty stark difference between the security of shares versus the security of property isn’t there?

John Howard:                    Well, the one thing I like about shares, it’s bit like being a car dealer, because a lot of car dealers become property dealers, but the difference they find and where they really struggle is, with cars, if they need to out all their stock on a Friday afternoon, they could go to the auction, sell them all within a few days. And the same with shares, you can cash in. I don’t know sometimes how you do, but everyone does. You can cash in your shares. With property you can’t do that. You are committed to, even if you’re going to put it in auction, that’s probably three months.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. So, as long as there’s liquidity in those shares and people are… There’s usually a buy and sell figure-

John Howard:                    Yes, I agree.

Paul Mahoney:                  … and so long as you go below that sell figure, then you’ll sell them, if it’s liquid.

John Howard:                    If it’s liquid.

Paul Mahoney:                  Sometimes that can dry up as well.

John Howard:                    [inaudible 00:08:01] the buy shares, they’re worth nothing. I used to quite like penny shares. They used to call them [inaudible 00:08:07] they call them now.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, small stocks.

John Howard:                    Yeah, small caps.

Paul Mahoney:                  Small caps. Right.

John Howard:                    Penny shares. You’d buy them for three P and hope they go to 12 P. It all sounded great, but all mine went to [inaudible 00:08:15].

Paul Mahoney:                  Which I think a lot of them do. And I suppose that’s my point is, obviously, when you buy shares in a company, your only security is that company. And a company can disappear overnight, not necessarily due to anything untoward, just because the business fails. Whereas, when you’re buying property, it’s a tangible asset.

John Howard:                    It’s a tangible asset pool, but of course, it can go down. I mean, in the ’92 recession, like I said, property went down 30, 35%, in East Anglia for instance, and up North, less. But if you’ve got 65% gearing on that property, you’ve got no equity. You’re, what we call, underwater in the trade. And it could take five to 10 years to get out of that situation. And of course, the bank may want their money back, in the meantime, but they have it revalued, for instance. And so, hang on a minute. Wait, you [inaudible 00:09:09] got to put a loan more cash into this deal or we’re going to take it off you and sell it.

Paul Mahoney:                  Well, I think that depends on the finance you’ve got in place.

John Howard:                    I agree. Yeah, it does.

Paul Mahoney:                  With most buy-to-let mortgages, they’re not able to do that, but if you’ve got more of a commercial arrangement in place than-

John Howard:                    Well, it’s interesting, Paul, and [inaudible 00:09:24] you should say that, because in 2008/2009, a number of the banks we were with did exactly that to us. So, they came to us and said, “Right. We know you can pay us the money back. You can refinance it somewhere.” Whereas, a lot of their clients couldn’t. So, they said to us, “Right. We’re going to revalue anyway, but whatever the outcome is, whatever the value is, we want you to refinance it within six months.” And the funny story with the Brighton stock, which actually went up when they valued it from last time, it hadn’t been bad for four years, it went up, and they went, “Well, this can’t be right. It must be fraud.” I said, “Excuse me. We don’t do things like that.” Had it revalued again at our expense again. By the way, they made us pay twice, and it came out the same valuation with another valuer. So, they said, “Oh, well, hmm, well we still want our money back.” So, we still had to pay it back.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Yeah, I suppose that does show the importance of obviously understanding that the finance you’re putting in place-

John Howard:                    Absolutely.

Paul Mahoney:                  … not that you didn’t understand it, but I’m just saying for anyone else.

John Howard:                    We might have had the 12, 15 million overdraft or something, and we weren’t even using it all. But the point was that they felt we could pay it back. And they had a lot of clients that couldn’t pay it back, so of course, they came to the ones who could, which is a little bit unfair sometimes because what you find is some of these more, how can I put it, rascally like people, should I say characters, they live the high life. When things are great, it’s brilliant. They’re great to go out with for a night out, by the way, but never ever do any business with these people. When things are bad, they dump it, dump the bank, start again. And of course, they’re better off sometimes because they haven’t held onto their stock to start again with a fresh bit of paper, and that isn’t really fair on the rest of us.

Paul Mahoney:                  That’s true. Okay. So, we’re talking about property as a secure asset. I suppose one of the key things, if you’re holding property, is actually having a tenant. Especially if [inaudible 00:11:23].

John Howard:                    Yes. It’s quite useful.

Paul Mahoney:                  Fairly useful.

John Howard:                    Although, may I just say something on that one? in Ireland, where they never had the property recession ever, and we used to go over there on a regular basis to see some friends and so on. Every year they say, “Oh, here come the Englishman. They think we’re going to have a recession.” That was about 2004, ’03, ’04. ’02.

Paul Mahoney:                  They definitely had one.

John Howard:                    They definitely had one. And guess what? And you say to them, “I see you bought a flat, David,” a friend of mine over… “Oh yes,” he said. I said, “What rent you getting?” He said, “What do you mean rent? We keep it clean.” I say, “What do you mean by that?” He said, “Well, no, we keep it clean. We don’t rent them because we’re going to sell them again for a vast profit in two years time.” And I was on the phone to him, and this is absolutely true. He’s on the phone and I’m listening to him, and he said, “No, I can’t take 900,000 for that,” put the phone down. He said, “Do remember that flat I bought three years ago for 250? It’s now worth 950, 950. I’ve only been offered 900.” He was insulted. I said, “David, get back on the phone and take it. Because guess what? It’s all going to go wrong.” Guess what happened, Paul.

Paul Mahoney:                  Went wrong.

John Howard:                    It went wrong.

Paul Mahoney:                  All right, we need to go to a break now. Join us after the break for more discussions on property as secure asset class.

Speaker 3:                          Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources, and regardless of our experience, knowledge, or time, we can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team and extra resources being available. Nova Financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom through property investment. With over a hundred years of experience, we shape your family’s future. To invest in property with absolute confidence call us on 02038000600 or visit Nova.financial.

John Howard:                    Hi, I’m John Howard, and I’m known as the property expert. The reason for this is, over the last 40 odd years, I’ve bought and sold over three and a half thousand properties, and I’m still going. I’m delighted to pass on my vast experience and knowledge to you through my property seminars that are taking place across the UK this year. To know more, please go to JohnHowardpropertyexpert.co.UK.

Speaker 3:                          Meet the Author is a brand new mini series involving leading experts in the property industry, including mentors, developers, property lawyers, and other industry experts who share insightful stories about their journey and their books. Each book is compiled by authors with years of valuable experience, tips, and observations, providing you with new knowledge about the property industry. To find out more, visit the website, property-gv.co.UK/library.

Stephen Galpin:                Hello and welcome to Property TV. I’m Stephen Galpin, host of Property Question Time. We’ve completed the filming of series one, over 260 successful episode. We’re now about to film series two. The difference? Well, we’re going to be filming in our new studio adjacent to the Canary Wharf development. Keep those questions coming into us. Keep our panelists, our experts busy, and we hope you enjoy the new series as much as you did the last one.

Paul Mahoney:                  Welcome back to Proper Wealth. Today, we’re discussing property investment as a secure asset class. And joining me again is John Howard. John. Okay. So, before the break, we spoke quite a lot about, well, property as a secure asset class, why its secure versus other asset classes. We spoke about some of the opportunities in boom and bust type situations.

John Howard:                    Yeah. I didn’t depress you, did I, with all that?

Paul Mahoney:                  Well, I think something that’s worth touching on when we talk about those types of cyclical upturns and downturns, is how to, in some ways, protect yourself against those downturns, because we all are going to experience them.

John Howard:                    Without question.

Paul Mahoney:                  Property is a longterm investment, and it’d be great if we could all sell the day before the bust and buy at the bottom. But that’s not how it works.

John Howard:                    Well, it isn’t, is it, Paul? I mean, I think there’s telltale signs when a recession is coming. First of all, property recessions on average once every 17 years, so are we close to a recession now than we were in 2010? My math isn’t great, but it tells me that we are. I think everyone would agree with that. And what happens quite often, people really know it’s coming, but they don’t want to believe it. And having survived three recessions, there’s telltale signs. Obviously, I don’t have to tell you, you’re a very bright man, and you advise people. Car sales, [inaudible 00:16:41], employment, there’s more unemployment, there’s lots and lots of [inaudible 00:16:46]. And of course, one of the biggest things is mortgages. So, there’s so many things that tell you that things aren’t great.

Paul Mahoney:                  It’s interesting that you raise those three points because car sales are at an all-time high, unemployment’s at an all-time low, and mortgage availability is at an all-time high.

John Howard:                    Hey, we have no problems!

Paul Mahoney:                  So, we’re in good [inaudible 00:17:04].

John Howard:                    Fill your boots!

Paul Mahoney:                  Based upon those three things. And I think that’s a good point, actually. The UK economy actually is pretty strong at the moment.

John Howard:                    Very good. It’s a lot better than the rest of Europe, that’s for sure.

Paul Mahoney:                  There’s lots of uncertainty in people’s minds around political instability and the B word, Brexit, and we won’t go down that rabbit hole. But actually, once that resolves itself, which hopefully it will soon, I think things are going to continue on their merry way, in quite a good positive fashion.

John Howard:                    I think one great thing about property, and I’ve listened to you speak on different occasions, and the one thing you get across very, very well is the fact that actually you can borrow this money so cheaply, so cheaply at the moment, over 25 years or whatever, and your return on your actual capital you’re putting in yourself is really high. And it’s a very, very good argument to buy and invest for longterm in property.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, yeah. I obviously completely agree.

John Howard:                    No, you’re modest, I can tell. Yeah.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Look, I think something that a lot of people overlook when it comes to leverage property is that they focus a lot on the actual gross returns on the asset rather than on the cash they’re putting in.

John Howard:                    And can I say, Paul, I would be guilty of that. I would be guilt… Okay, I know I’m very hard nosed. I’ve been brought up in a different era to yourself, for instance. The markets were different and funding was difficult to get, unlike now with so much opportunity for people, so much funding available, and so much of good advice that you give and other companies like you can give, It’s so easy for people now to do it, and a lot of them are taking advantage, and that is great, but they do need the right advice.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Yeah. I suppose, just to put some numbers to that when we’re talking about leverage, we generally aim for a net yield on funds applied of between five to 10%, which is pretty achievable in the current market and not bad going. That’s obviously just one side of the equation. The UK average from a capital growth perspective over the past 20 years is 5.5%, and that includes two recessions, as you say. So, if we scale that back to five, you’ve got a 75% mortgage, 5% on the asset value, is 20% of our cash. Now, that puts you at 25 to 30% a year.

John Howard:                    Now, Paul, that is of no interest to me whatsoever.

Paul Mahoney:                  Okay.

John Howard:                    But to the longterm investors, that is brilliant.

Paul Mahoney:                  That’s my point.

John Howard:                    And if they’ve got another job, that’s fantastic. And if eventually they have enough that they don’t need another job, brilliant, absolutely brilliant. And they’ll be sitting there thinking, “Well, 30 years ago we bought, or we’ve got all these properties we bought, the mortgage is all paid off on them,” or whatever, “And we’re worth a huge amount of money.” If people start young enough, they can’t really fail. Because if you look at the property market over the last 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 years, it’s only gone one way. Bill costs won’t go down. Land, they’re not making it any more. I don’t if you heard that, but they’re not making land anymore. There’s a massive demand. There’s a million more people in the UK every three years. [inaudible 00:20:15] National Health Service can’t cope. Everything is going the right way for property.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, I agree.

John Howard:                    What about diamonds?

Paul Mahoney:                  Diamonds? I don’t know anything about diamonds.

John Howard:                    Well, I know I haven’t gone down but they-

Paul Mahoney:                  I know I bought an expensive one for my wife at one point.

John Howard:                    So did I, funny enough. Very good. They used to say you should spend three months of a man’s wages for a engagement ring.

Paul Mahoney:                  Okay.

John Howard:                    I’m sure the amount you earn, it’s probably only a month. It’s very interesting. Gold’s the same. I mean, gold, again, we’ve spoken about gold. Gold versus property’s an interesting one, because, I mean, it’s capital, it’s all you’re doing is protecting your capital. You’re getting no income from it, so I mean, for me, property outsmarts that.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, I agree. Gold, obviously, does very well in bad times, because people view it as a safety net.

John Howard:                    Absolutely, yeah.

Paul Mahoney:                  So, maybe having some gold is sensible. I don’t have any.

John Howard:                    Me neither, funny enough.

Paul Mahoney:                  I can’t really get my head around having gold. Where do you keep it?

John Howard:                    One other thing is, say you’ve got 100,000 pounds worth of gold… You put it in a vault, by the way.

Paul Mahoney:                  Right.

John Howard:                    Yeah. Not the one that got robbed recently. So, you put it in a vault, obviously. You never see the damn thing. That’s the other problem with it. But of course, if you put 100,000 pounds worth of gold, cash, it’s got to be cash… Yeah? You buy the gold, 100,000 pounds, you could actually buy a property… If I gave you that 100,000 to you, for instance, you would probably buy me three properties with it because you give it up and all the rest of it. So, I much prefer the… But you just need to know and be prepared for the odd downturn over 30 year…. If you’re borrowing the money over 25 years, you’ll go to see probably one and a half-ish, two downturns. And you have to be realistic about that and sensible.

Paul Mahoney:                  And I think the key to… Depends what we’re talking about, obviously. Property development’s slightly different because there’s timeframes on that.

John Howard:                    Well, to be blunt about it, you… on the line.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah. Exactly.

John Howard:                    And if you get the timing wrong, you’ve done 20 odd properties, all empty, all with interest running on, you can’t sell the damn things, you’re in trouble, so that’s very different to what the sort of investment you do, for instance [inaudible 00:22:28].

Paul Mahoney:                  When we’re talking more passive, as you say, longer term.

John Howard:                    Yeah. Safer, much, much safer.

Paul Mahoney:                  It’s very important to try to mitigate the risks associated with those downturns. Obviously, you are likely to take a hit to your capital value at some point.

John Howard:                    Of course.

Paul Mahoney:                  But in my eyes, that doesn’t really matter so much, so long as your property is rented.

John Howard:                    And also, as long as the [inaudible 00:22:49] or the bank can’t do what they do to the developers, which is when you’re borrowing over five years, the term comes up, oh, guess what? We don’t want to carry on. If they can’t do that, and most of the buy-to-let mortgage, they can’t do that, can they, I believe.

Paul Mahoney:                  No. That’s right.

John Howard:                    Then you’re pretty safe, aren’t you? Very, very safe.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yep. So, longterm, low cost, and to determine [inaudible 00:23:09] recall the mortgage, so it is quite safe. The only other risk aside from having a tenant is the cost of the borrowings, which is harder to control, but you can stress test, you can-

John Howard:                    And also, the first five years of any mortgage are probably the hardest, bit like marriage, really. The first five. You get used to each other and a few [inaudible 00:23:30] in-between, because you’re just setting the scene, aren’t you, for what’s going to happen going forward probably. But the first five years are probably the hardest, and after that, after you paid five years worth of… You’ve got five years of the rent and everything else-

Paul Mahoney:                  We’ve got three left.

John Howard:                    Three left? Congratulations. So, after that, it gets easier, and I think that’s what you find. The people I speak to who, they’re very inspirational, these young people I speak to who, in the early twenties, they’ve saved the deposit or they’ve managed to borrow a deposit and they’re going to buy their first property. They haven’t gone on holiday with all their mates, they’ve saved their money. And I always say to them, by the time you get to 30, and you’ve got three or four, five, six, seven properties, and your mates have just carried on going on holiday, you’re going to be laughing at them because they’re going to be stuck with nothing in the bank and you’re going to have a load of properties and good luck to them.

Paul Mahoney:                  Yeah, absolutely. And that’s one person’s scenario where they’re capping their lifestyle a little bit to get to improve themselves. But yeah, there’s various other situations that I come across, like business owners for example. So many business owners I meet with, they’ve got just excess cash sitting in their bank account doing nothing, and that can just do so much better in property, and you can build a property business alongside your own business, which can work really well.

John Howard:                    And you know what I say to people when they say to me, “Oh, look, John, I bought my first property, I’m going to give up work”? Oh my goodness, please don’t give up work.

Paul Mahoney:                  We spoke about this [inaudible 00:24:55].

John Howard:                    We have. And it’s mad and it’s scary. If somebody’s got an income, keep the income coming in, and if it’s a business and they’re earning good money and they can fund property deals out of that, that’s a fantastic situation to be in.

Paul Mahoney:                  I use the example in one of my talks yesterday, so far as if you’ve got a profitable business for 10 years, let’s say, and you’re able to buy one or two properties a year because of that, 10 years down the line you’ve got 10 to 20 properties, which is a business in itself.

John Howard:                    It is a business in itself. And if you look at the hard, people like me who are developers and investors, we have to take out a lot of money every year to live off. And by the way, the longer you go, the more success you are, the bigger entourage you have and the more it costs you to… You don’t want a downturn or otherwise, it’s difficult. So, we’re constantly taking money out to live off. Well, if you don’t have to do that, you just let it grow naturally, it’s fantastic.

Paul Mahoney:                  Absolutely. In multiple income streams.

John Howard:                    Very good.

Paul Mahoney:                  Key to success.

John Howard:                    There we are.

Paul Mahoney:                  I think that’s all we’ve got time for now. Thanks for joining me, John.

John Howard:                    It’s an absolute pleasure as usual, Paul.

Paul Mahoney:                  And thank you for joining us again. Join us next time on Proper Wealth.

Speaker 3:                          Property is a great investment option, but it’s one of the largest purchases that you’ll ever make. As individuals, we’re all limited by our resources, and regardless of our experience, knowledge, or time, we can achieve much more with the help of a qualified team and extra resources being available. Nova Financial specialize in assisting clients to achieve financial freedom through property investment. With over a hundred years of experience, we shape your family’s future. To invest in property with absolute confidence call us on 02038000600 or visit Nova.financial.

John Howard:                    My name is John Howard, and I’ve been investing and developing properties for over 40 years. In that time, I’ve been very successful, but of course, I always made the odd mistake as well. In my book, I explain how to be successful and what to do should something go wrong. I’ve survived three property recessions. I can help you to the same. My book is available online. Please go to JohnHowardpropertyexpert.co.UK.

Speaker 4:                          The antiquated village of [foreign language 00:27:38] in rural [foreign language 00:27:40] may not have the cachet of Paris or London, yet it houses one of the 10 fastest growing property consultancies in Europe. It is home to Leggett Immobilier, the leading international estate agent in France. They have around 16,000 properties for sale right across the country, with a network of 400 agents who provide local expertise and market knowledge. If you want to know the best villages, schools, restaurants, or [foreign language 00:28:07] then the Leggett team will know the answer. As well as advising buyers on the local market and regional property prices, they also have a bilingual contracts team who ensure that your purchase will go through as smoothly as possible. Leggett has been voted best estate agent in France for the past four years running. To experience these exceptional service levels for yourself, then head to our website, Leggettfrance.com.

Speaker 3:                          Meet the author is a brand new mini series involving leading experts in the property industry, including mentors, developers, property lawyers, and other industry experts who share insightful stories about their journey and their books. Each book is compiled by authors with years of valuable experience, tips and observations providing you with new knowledge about the property industry. To find out more, visit the website, property-gv.co.UK/library.

Stephen Galpin:                Hello, and welcome to Property TV. I’m Stephen Galpin, host of Property Question Time. We’ve completed the filming of series one, over 260 successful episodes. We’re now about to film series two. The difference? Well, we’re going to be filming in our new studio adjacent to the Canary Wharf development. Keep those questions coming into us. Keep our panelists, our experts, busy, and we hope you enjoy the new series as much as you did the last one

 

Proper Wealth

Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 7: Finding a Good Development Site – Joe Billingham
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 7: Finding a Good Development Site – Joe Billingham
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Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 6: The General Election and 2020 and Beyond – Tomer Aboody
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 6: The General Election and 2020 and Beyond – Tomer Aboody
read more
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 5: Property as a Secure Asset Class – John Howard (Property Developer)
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 5: Property as a Secure Asset Class – John Howard (Property Developer)
read more
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 4: Innovation in Property Management – Jess Ford (Herddle)
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 4: Innovation in Property Management – Jess Ford (Herddle)
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Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 3: High Networth Private Banking – Peter Izard (Investec)
Proper Wealth – S2 Episode 3: High Networth Private Banking – Peter Izard (Investec)
read more
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